Username:

Password:

Fargot Password? / Help



Archive for December 2012

0

"The Day We Celebrate:" Emancipation Day in Charleston, Then and Now

On December 23, 1865 the South Carolina Leader, an African American newspaper based in Charleston, SC posted the following announcement [1]:

Barbecue -- January first, Emancipation Day, will be celebrated by a procession of the different organizations of the city. A barbecue will be held at some convenient locality during the day. July 4th is the anniversary of our national independence. January 1st is the anniversary of our national freedom. It is the day we celebrate.

Watch Night and the Emancipation Proclamation

The anticipated celebration marked the third anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by president Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. After the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, Lincoln warned that if states within the Confederacy did not rejoin the Union, he would issue a decree on January 1, 1863 making slaves in rebellious states forever free.

On December 30, 1862, in churches throughout the Confederate states, enslaved congregations gathered for Watch Night in anticipation of Lincoln's decree. Together they prayed the old year out and the new year in with fervent hope of the promised emancipation. On January 1, 1863 Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared slaves in the Confederate states forever free.

The Emancipation Proclamation did not immediately free slaves in the Confederacy, as it was unenforceable in those states, but the decree effectively shifted the focus of the Civil War from a war to preserve the Union to a war to end slavery in the United States [2].

Image: "Watch Meeting, Dec. 31, 1862--Waiting for the Hour," Library of Congress Digital Print LC-DIG-ppmsca-10980. No Known Restrictions on Publication.

Charleston's First Emancipation Day Celebration

Charleston's first Emancipation Day celebration on January 1, 1866 included a parade, barbecue and ceremony with addresses by Union military officers and leaders of the Charleston African American community. The celebration, attended by thousands of the city's residents, was organized by a committee composed of Charleston's African American community leaders.

Conditions for the parade and barbecue were not ideal. Heavy rains in the days before had left the streets and fairground muddy and wet, and the day was overcast, but that did not dampen the spirits of those present. The procession began at the Battery and made its way up Meeting, Hazel and King streets, ending at the city's Race Course.

Troops from the 33rd United States Colored Troops provided the escort followed by organizations including the Union League, Good Fellows Elect, Young Men's Brotherly Association, Planters and Mechanics Benevolent Society, the Ashley, Niagara and Comet Fire companies, Home Guard Company B and the Drum Corps of the 33rd United States Colored Troops.

The South Carolina Leader described the scene:

The throng of people followed the procession until they came to the place of the barbecue. There must have been an area of some ten acres of ground covered by the densely crowded mass of humanity. The scene, as viewed from the speakers' stand, was grand and sublime. As far as the eye could reach was one vast living, moving panorama.

For the next four hours, celebrants were regaled with speeches given by military and community leaders [3].

Charleston's Emancipation Day celebration became a tradition, one that continues to the present day.

Jubilee Project: Emancipation Day Celebration, 2013

This year, the College of Charleston's Jubilee Project, a collaborative academic and cultural project of the Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World (CLAW) program at the College of Charleston, will combine traditional Emancipation Day celebrations with special one-time events in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Today, December 31, 2012, the City of Charleston's New Year’s Eve celebration will be followed by “Watch Night” services all around Charleston. On the stroke of midnight churches with bells will ring them out loud and clear to celebrate the Emancipation Proclamation.

Tomorrow, Jan 1, 2013, the annual Emancipation Day parade will be followed by a special church service in Morris Brown AME Church at 13 Morris Street, Charleston, SC.

For more information on today and tomorrow's Jubilee Project events, please visit the Jubilee Project website at http://jubileeprojectsc.wordpress.com/.

References Cited

[1] "Barbecue." The South Carolina Leader, 23 Dec 1865, Page 2. Chronicling America, database online at Library of Congress, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025783/1865-12-23/ed-1/seq-2/, accessed 30 Dec 2012.

[2] "Watch Night Tradition Reaches 150th Year." Washington Times, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/dec/30/watch-night-tradition-reaches-150th-year/, accessed 30 Dec 2012.

[3] "The Day We Celebrate: Grand Jubilee. Procession and Barbecue." The South Carolina Leader, Saturday, 6 Jan 1866. Chronicling America, database online at Library of Congress, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025783/1866-01-06/ed-1/seq-3.pdf, accessed 30 Dec 2012.

0

Marriage and Divorce Records for Charleston, Strawberry Ferry, Johns Island, and Camden, 1865-1866

Source: United States, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. Marriage and Divorce Records for Charleston, Strawberry Ferry, Johns Island, and Camden, 1865-1866. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Series Number .F601301, Record Group Number 601300.

Notation at top of journal: "Marriage records from an old book used by Rev. Mansfield French, Chaplain in U.S. Army, stationed at Beaufort, South Carolina from March 1862 as Chaplain of Hospital Base No. 1, U.S. Army. He was engaged in Freedmens Bureau work for the Government and held his commission as Chaplain until about February 1868, working in Negro education & relief work at Beaufort and at Charleston, SC."

Groom: Patrick Williams

From What Place: Wadmalaw Island SC

to

Bride: Diana Brown

Date: March 21, 1866

From What Place: Wadmalaw Island SC

Rev. M. French

At What Place Married: Charleston SC

Groom: Lewis Fenick

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Leah Fenick

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Joseph Motor

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Katherine Simmons

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: George Harris

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Nancy Middleton

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Sampy Lovely

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Tenah Wright

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Charles Harris

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Mary Ann Brown

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Snow Aiken

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Lucy Rady

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Joshua Garrett

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Rose Morton

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Ishmael Steward

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Bina Aiken

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

March 20, 1866

By Rev. Thos J. Evans

At What Place Married: Strawberry Ferry SC

Groom: Handiff Ford

From What Place: Strawberry Ferry SC

to

Bride: Dappy Wally

From What Place: Johns Island SC

December 10, 1865

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Toby Heyward

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Affy Wally

From What Place: Johns Island SC

December 10, 1865

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Peter Connor

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: L. Whaley

From What Place: Johns Island SC

December 21, 1865

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Henry Muck

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: L. Whaley

From What Place: Johns Island SC

December 21, 1865

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Kit Drayton

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Phillis Whaley

From What Place: Johns Island SC

January 10, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Jack Huggins

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Mary Cambell

From What Place: Johns Island SC

January 12, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Scipio Brown

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: B. Whaley

From What Place: Johns Island SC

February 1, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Adam Roberts

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Jane Townsend

From What Place: Johns Island SC

February 1, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Mosy Jenkins

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Jane Townsend

From What Place: Johns Island SC

March 1, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Joseph Doctor

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Bina Jenkins

From What Place: Johns Island SC

March 10, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Paul Drayton

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Sarah Townsend

From What Place: Johns Island SC

March 11, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Charley Bryant

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Sarah West

From What Place: Johns Island SC

March 11, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: John Simmons

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Cath Jenkins

From What Place: Johns Island SC

January 15, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Adam Pinckney

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Jane Francis

From What Place: Johns Island SC

January 15, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Joe Chisolm

From What Place:Johns Island SC

to

Bride: Betsie Bennett

From What Place: Johns Island SC

February 4, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Henry Redick

From What Place:35th USCT

to

Bride: Margaret Moses

From What Place: Charleston SC

April 24, 1866

By Rev. John Graham

At What Place Married: Johns Island SC

Groom: Riley Moore

From What Place:35th USCT

to

Bride: Emma Carada (?)

From What Place: Charleston SC

April 24, 1866

By Rev. M. French

At What Place Married: Charleston SC

Groom: Orman Smith

From What Place:35th USCT

to

Bride: Amy Chism

From What Place: Charleston SC

April 24, 1866

By Rev. M. French

At What Place Married: Charleston SC

Groom: Caesar Collins

From What Place:35th USCT

to

Bride: Fanny Fenix

From What Place: Charleston SC

April 24, 1866

By Rev. M. French

At What Place Married: Charleston SC

Groom: Bartley Millard

From What Place:35th USCT

to

Bride: Rina Reed

From What Place: Camden SC

March 29, 1866

By Rev. M. French

Groom: Zacharia Keys

From What Place:NC, 35th USCT

to

Bride: Eliza Richardson

From What Place: Camden SC

March 29, 1866

By Rev. M. French

Groom: Edmund Gregory

From What Place:New Bern, NC, 35th USCT

to

Bride: Elizabeth Ford

From What Place: Charleston SC

March 29, 1866

By Rev. M. French

Groom: John Gaskell

From What Place: 35th USCT

to

Bride: Elizabeth Prichard

From What Place: Charleston SC

March 29, 1866

By Rev. M. French

Groom: Griffin Benson

From What Place: 35th USCT

to

Bride: Jane Jenkins

From What Place: Charleston SC

March 29, 1866

By Rev. M. French

Divorces

John Young

and

Nancy Young

Charleston, SC

April 5, 1866

Samuel Wigfall

Charleston, SC

and

Annie Wigfall

Mt. Pleasant, SC

April 5, 1866

John Morrison

Charleston, SC

and

Finnie Morrison

Charleston, SC

April 17, 1866
0

Marriage Notices from Charleston African American Newspapers

MARRIED In this city, by Rev. T.W. Lewis, Andrew Smalls to Tena Palmer. 10th Harry White to Marg't Green. Nov. 17, John Moore to Nancy Ann Ore(?). Nov 23, Joseph Richardson to Anna Lawrence.

On Sunday, 17th Inst., by Rev. Jacob Legare, Mr. Joseph Milliken to Miss Frances, daughter of H.P. Pinckney.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, South Carolina Leader, 25 Nov 1865, Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025783/1865-11-25/ed-2/seq-3/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

MARRIED In this city, by Rev. T.W. Lewis, December 2nd, William White to Rosana Vanderhorst.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, The South Carolina Leader, 9 Dec 1865, Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025783/1865-12-09/ed-2/seq-3/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

MARRIED In this city, by Rev. T.W. Lewis, Dec 24th Julia Williams to John Houston. 28th, Frank Patterson to Rebecca Simmons. 31st, July Lloyd to Rhoda Gaddis. 31st, Julius Martin to Betsey Brown.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, South Carolina Leader, 6 Jan 1866, Page 5. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025783/1866-01-06/ed-1/seq-5/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

Marriages -- At Darlington on the 16th Inst., by Rev. B.F. Whitemore, William Robinson and Miss Serena Sanders.

At Florence Feb. 17th by Rev. T.S. Lewis, Joseph Cannon and Sally Ruggles; also Wm. Deas and Sylvia Blacwell; also Daniel Wilson and Harriet Nettles.

On the 14th Inst., in this City, at the residence of the bride, by Rev. B.F. Randolph, Mr. Wilson Heyward, to Miss Annie Deveaux. All of Charleston.

On the 20th inst., in this City, at the house of the bride, by Rev. B.F. Randolph, Mr. Rash Perry to Miss Fannie Brown. All of this City.

At the Chapel of the Wentworth St. A.M.E. Church, Feb 21st by Rev. A. Webster, Mr. William Brown and Miss Patcy Strafon.

Also on the 21st Inst., by the same, at the Baker Institute, Mr. William Stuart and Miss Elsie Liles. All of this City.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, The Charleston Advocate, 23 Feb 1867, Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025784/1867-02-23/ed-1/seq-3/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

MARRIED -- at Sumter, May 25th. by Rev. T.W. Lewis, Edmond Chambers to Melvina Moore. Also Merriman Millett to Anna Keith, also Pinckney Owens to Lovlea (?) James.

By Rev. R.H. Cain, on Wednesday morning, May 27th at Morris A.M.E. Church, Mr. Benj. W. Middleton to Miss Mary Sabina Campbell, all of Charleston.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, The Charleston Advocate, 1 Jun 1867, Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025784/1867-06-01/ed-1/seq-3/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

Marriages --- At Lynchburg So. Ca. 20th Inst. by Rev. B.F. Whittemore, Abraham Durant and Sophronia Durant.

At Darlington 22d inst. by same, Abraham Brown and Miss Silly Bacot.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, The Charleston Advocate, 2 Mar 1867, Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025784/1867-03-02/ed-1/seq-3/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

WEDDED ON WHEELS

Novel Experience of a South Carolina Couple

Greenville. Special. -- The passengers and crew of the Southern train between Columbia and Greenville were treated to an unusual attraction, being witnesses to the marriage of Miss Riggs of Orangeburg to Mr. Holloway of Chappells, which was solemnized while the train was speeding along between Helena and Silver Street at the rate of 45 miles an hour. Miss Riggs was en route to Abbeville to visit the family of her uncle there. Mr. Holloway and a couple of friends boarded the train at Prosperity, having arranged that the minister should get on at Newberry. As soon after leaving Newberry as possible the marriage took place and the happy folks left the train at Chappells, where they will reside.

Source: Chronicling America, Database Online at Library of Congress. Marriage Notices, The Afro-American Citizen, 17 Jan 1900, Page 1. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025782/1900-01-17/ed-1/seq-1/, accessed 22 Dec 2012.

1

Slave Dwelling Project Announces 2013 Schedule

Thirty nine overnight stays in extant slave dwellings is proof that the Slave Dwelling Project is doing well. The year 2012 saw a lot of firsts for the project. For the second consecutive year, a northern state was included in the project when I stayed at the Bush Holly House in Greenwich, Connecticut. Mississippi was the tenth state added to the project when I participated in the Holly Springs Pilgrimage in Holly Springs, Mississippi.

The state of Georgia joined the project when I stayed in a slave cabin in Sautee Nacoochee. Virginia was the twelfth state added to the project when I stayed at Bacon’s Castle in Surry. Virginia also provided the opportunity for the first institution of higher learning to participate when I stayed at Sweet Briar College in Sweet Briar, Virginia. The first repeat visit was done at Boone Hall Plantation in Mt. Pleasant, SC.

My collaboration with the group Coming To The Table was established when I joined them in Richmond, Virginia for their national gathering. That relationship with Coming To The Table was further enhanced when members of the group joined me for overnight stays in the Bush Holly House in Greenwich, Connecticut; Bacon’s Castle in Surry, Virginia and Sweet Briar College in Sweet Briar, Virginia.

2013 will be just as exciting if not more. I will get the opportunity to apply to all of the 2013 stays all that I have learned from the first stay which occurred at Magnolia Plantation in Charleston, SC in May 2010, to the last stay that occurred at Boone Hall Plantation in Mt. Pleasant, SC in November of 2012. This knowledge will make for more robust programming associated with every stay and assist the public in recognizing extant former slave dwellings that may be hidden in plain view such as spaces currently used as guest houses, pool houses, garages, storage spaces, etc. More importantly, this knowledge will help the public in recognizing those extant slave dwelling that are in dire need of stabilization and restoration.

Hopsewee Plantation: Friday, March 1

Slave Dwelling at Hopsewee Plantation

The first scheduled stay, Hopsewee Plantation located on the North Santee River in Georgetown County, SC will be a repeat stay. In addition to the public programs that will be provided, local school kids will compete via essays to decide those who will spend the night in the two slave cabins located at the site. Additionally, this stay will be accompanied by a dinner and performances by storytellers Zenobia Washington and Sophia Jackson both of whom are natives of Georgetown, SC.

Laurelwood Plantation, Eastover, SC: March 8-9

Slave Dwelling at Laurelwood Plantation

Of all the stays scheduled for 2013, the one that I anticipate the most is Laurelwood Plantation in Eastover, SC because it is a true testament of why the project exists. I was originally scheduled to stay there on April 15, 2011 but its dilapidated condition dictated that I pass on that opportunity. The new owners Jackie and Jeremy Thomas vowed that the cabin would be restored along with the mansion. The contractor rushed frantically to get the cabin in a state that was inhabitable for a stay that was to occur on November 3, 2012. Unforeseen circumstances would not let that stay occur on that day. The happy ending is that the cabin has been restored and the owners have granted me unlimited access for educational purposes.

Holly Springs, MS: Friday, April 12 – Sunday, April 14

Holly Springs, MS Pilgrimage

The Holly Springs, Mississippi Pilgrimage will be a repeat. In a program titled The Behind the Big House Tour, visitors will have the opportunity for the second consecutive year to tour the mansions and the slave dwellings. This is a concept that I have been trying to get other well established historic house tours to adopt but they all seem to be content with only telling part of the story. The 2013 stay will also include a stay at Rowan Oaks, the former home of William Faulkner.

Salisbury, NC: Friday, June 14 – Saturday, June 15

The Salisbury, North Carolina stay will be my first stay there but my second stay in the state of North Carolina. It will be special because it will coincide with Juneteenth. When the emancipation proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863, it meant nothing if there were no Federal troops in the area to enforce the document. Federal troops did not reach Galveston, TX until June 19, 1865. Commemorating this historic day of freedom has become a national event.

Assault on Battery Wagner Sesquicentennial Commemoration and Stay at Old City Jail, Charleston: July 18 – 21

July 18, 2013 is the sesquicentennial of the Assault on Battery Wagner on Morris Island, SC. This Civil War battle was depicted in the 1989 award winning movie Glory, starring Matthew Broderick, Morgan Freeman and Denzel Washington. Some of the African American men taken as prisoners during the battle were held in the Old City Jail in Charleston, SC. In addition to commemorating the battle on Morris Island as African Americans reenactors have been doing for the past ten year, for the 150th anniversary we will spend the nights of July 18 – 20 in the Old City Jail.

College of Charleston

For the second consecutive year an institution of higher learning will be among the places stayed. That institution will be the College of Charleston which is located well within the city limits of Charleston, SC. It is said that 40% of the African American population of the United States can trace their ancestry back to the port of Charleston, SC. The College of Charleston stay and programs associated with it will provide the opportunity to interpret how institutions factored into chattel slavery in the United States. This stay will also provide the opportunity to further interpret how slavery existed in urban areas.

Ossabaw Island, GA: Friday, May 10 – Saturday, May 11

Abolishing the international slave trade in 1808 did not end the institution of slavery in the United States. No longer did the slave ships deliver their cargo to the major ports such as Baltimore, Maryland; Charleston, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; or New Orleans, Louisiana but they still continued to deliver that cargo to more obscure places like the Sea Islands located off the coast of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. These islands make up the eastern most portion of the Gullah Geechee National Heritage Area Corridor. Ossabaw Island located off the coast of Georgia near Savannah was one of those islands. The overnight stay on Ossabaw Island will be my first in a slave cabin on a Sea Island.

Sotterly Plantation, St. Mary's City, MD: Sunday, September 22 – Tuesday, September 24

Historic St. Mary’s City, Maryland will be my second stay in that state. The first was Sotterley Plantation in Hollywood. Quite surprisingly, this stay will happen as a result of a presentation that I gave at a public program at Sweet Briar College in Virginia. The organizers of the Maryland stay were audience members and made the offer and I of course accepted.

Boone Hall Plantation, Mt. Pleasant, SC: November 8 – 10

Slave Dwelling at Boone Hall Plantation, Mt. Pleasant, SC

Boone Hall Plantation in Mt. Pleasant, SC will be a stay of opportunity. The Assault on Battery Wagner, the battle depicted in the movie Glory will be reenacted at Boone Hall Plantation in 2013. Although the battle historically took place on Morris Island which is located in the Charleston harbor, it is logistically impossible to reenact a battle there because you can only get there by boat. While the reenactors sleep in there encampments, I will again inhabit the slave cabins.

How to Participate

For those of you who shared the slave dwelling experience with me in 2012 or in any prior year, you know the routine, you are welcome to participate in any future stay(s). For those of you who have not shared the experience but would like to, please let me know as-soon-as-possible. I must seek permission from the property owners for your participation. I am especially interested in sharing the experience with descendants of the enslaved associated with the dwellings; descendants of slave owners; or descendants of a slave and a slave owner. Whatever the category, all are welcome because the ultimate goal is to bring much needed attention to extant slave dwellings in the United States.

Slave Dwelling Project 2013 Schedule

  • Friday, March 1: Hopsewee, Georgetown, SC
  • March 8 – 9: Laurelwood Plantation, Eastover, SC
  • Friday, April 12 – Sunday, April 14: Pilgrimage, Holly Springs, Mississippi
  • Friday, May 10 – Saturday, May 11: Ossabaw Island, Georgia
  • Friday, June 14 – Saturday, June 15: Juneteenth, Slave Dwelling, Salisbury, NC
  • July 18 – 21: Old City Jail, Charleston, SC
  • Wednesday, August 28: College of Charleston
  • Sunday, September 22 – Tuesday, September 24: Sotterly Plantation, Historic St. Mary’s City, Maryland
  • November 8 – 10: Boone Hall Plantation, Mt. Pleasant, SC