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Excerpt: African Americans of Washington County, Georgia:

From Colonial Times through Reconstruction

By Adam Adolphus, Sr.

Alexander Hayes Family

Betsy Braswell Swint (1861-1930)

Carrie McNeil Sessions

Catharine Harmon and Family

Dathie Haines (1842-1926)

David and Anna Gordon Family

David Cheeves (1873-1932)

Descendants of Asa Gordon (1830-1904)

Edmund D. Pierce (1881-after 1933)

Eugene Hodges (1862-1942)

Hayes-Smith House, 1890s

Hayes-Smith House, Present Day

Katie Trawick Adolphus (1880-1954)

Martha Hayes (1834-1898)

Pennie Hooks Harris (1858-1942)

Porter Boyer (1845-1925)

Robert Kelsey

Rosa E. Sanders Kelsey (1858-1913)

Sarah Pierce (b. 1874)

Sonnie Fields (b. 1874), Washington County, GA

Susan Hooks Taylor, Washington County, GA

Texann Fields Kneece (1876-1970)

William Henry Smith (1853-1929)

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#FFCC00fadetrue
To the memory of ELIZA “HODGES” (1832 – 1898) My Great-Great Grandmother, “The Black Cherokee Rose.” Purchased on the block at the Louisville, Georgia Slave Market in 1839. Parents unknown. Raised by Harriet and Tom, Slaves of Abel Hodges, Sr. Died March 14, 1898

Preface

This work grew out of a search for my ancestors in Washington County, Georgia. It soon became apparent during the search that there was a severe shortage of actual data on African Americans pre Civil War that was readily available to the general public. On a visit to the Probate Clerk’s Office in the Washington County Courthouse, I came across Appraisal Book “A” wherein, I found a reference to my great-great grandmother. At that point, I also saw that there were other slaves listed in the volume.

I also visited the Genealogy Research Center Old Jail Library on Jones Street in Sandersville, Georgia. There, I came across several family histories in various degrees of development. Some were meticulously researched, documented and printed. Others were less elaborate. These family histories often included the wills that were part of colonial Washington County up to the present time. Many of those wills often contained the names of African Americans who were held by particular families. The data in these family histories were also part of the greater narrative of an African American family’s history even though limited. I began searching through family histories in a somewhat haphazard manner. I learned that I would have to be more methodical.

So I began anew in alphabetical order of the families using the Genealogy Society’s Library numbering system 929.2(FAM) (for Family Name). When I was about a third of the way through them, a new volume appeared: Washington County, Georgia Estate Records, 1822 -1885: Published by the Brantley Association of America. The previous volume set me more directly onto the path I followed.

This work includes slave listings in the Family History volumes of the Genealogy Research Center’s library, Washington County Estate Records: 1822-1885, the Washington County Probate records that pertain to slaves, freemen and freedmen, U. S. Census records for Washington County, Georgia from 1820 through 1880, ten different church records, Washington County records housed at the Georgia Archives in Morrow, Georgia, Georgia death records, newspapers of the period, tombstone inscriptions from a few African American cemeteries and information gleaned from several other resources. There are a total of some 30,000 + names, with some of them being repetitions or duplications.

The period covered starts with Washington County’s early beginning and extends through the Reconstruction Period up through the early 1880’s. (The general thought in the African American community in Washington County was that all the historic records of the county had been destroyed in the two courthouse fires during the nineteenth century. This assumption turned out to be false. Some of the records were destroyed, but enough were salvaged to provide a clearer picture of what happened to some of the early African Americans of Washington County, Georgia.)

Image Courtesy of Digital Library of GA

Washington County, Georgia, 1846

Our attempt was to record every slave listed in the foregoing publications and documents and to provide a single source document for African American genealogical research for Washington County, Georgia. As far as is known, this is the first document which attempts to accomplish this.

This volume was intended initially to provide a source reference for African Americans in search of their heritage. However, as the work progressed, it became apparent that the information is useful for family research for all people with roots in Washington County, Georgia. The reader should be aware that these listings represent only a fraction of all the slaves that lived in Washington County, Georgia during the period of this study. VIEW VOLUME TABLE OF CONTENTS

In the “Appendices” section of this work is a part designated “Anecdotes and Stories.” This is a meager attempt to highlight some notable information about a few individuals of the thousands named in this volume. It would be impossible and presumptuous to attempt to tell the story of the lives of so many individuals.

The indexes of this volume are indispensable in locating individuals. All slaves were listed by their given names. Freedmen are also listed by their surnames as were free African Americans. One should also be aware that the spellings of slaves’ names were often phonetically derived by the original recorders of those names and had variations from one set of documents to another. In the case of the Washington County Tax Digest for 1869, the microfilm record in some sections lacks clarity from a visual aspect. Many entries are either totally or partially illegible. Where there is partial legibility, though recorded in the main text, no attempt was made to index those entries. The reader is referred to the original document (a disk containing the Washington County Tax Digest for 1869 is available at the Genealogy Research Center). VIEW INDEX 1 | VIEW INDEX 2

It is hoped that this volume will provide some recognition of those African Americans in Washington County, Georgia whose existence and identity as individuals have been long shrouded in anonymity will be brought to the light of day and remembrance in the minds and eyes of their descendants and other interested parties. It is unfortunate that thousands of African Americans lived and toiled in Washington County, Georgia and will never be identified. I regret that I was not able to gain the support of the Georgia Department of Vital Statistics in extracting the names of most of the African Americans born before 1880 and who died during the period from 1928-1940. It is suspected that are at least 1,000 individuals in this group who are not included in this study.

Washington County Biographies

Dathie Haines

Dathie’s mother was a Cherokee Indian named Chloe and her father was black, Dathie Haine (1842-1926) name unknown. She and her family were living in the North Georgia – Cherokee, NC area when she was captured by some white men while picking berries in the woods with her brother (name unknown) and sold into slavery. Dathie’s brother was able to escape. She was sold into slavery at Louisville, Georgia to Nathan and Jane Haines. Nathan gave Dathie to his granddaughter Missy Haines as her personal slave. Both Dathie and Missy were 6 years old. Missy and Dathie went to live with Missy’s aunt and uncle, James “Jim” and Lentittis Haines. Jim was from Ireland. Dathie had four children during slavery by her owner Jim (Mary, Joe, Washington Beauty Spot “Wash”, and Betsy). Dathie had one child that was not Jim Braswell’s; her name was Sally. After slavery Jim Braswell gave Dathie and the children 600 acres of land to live on. However, because they could not read or write, they were tricked into putting their X’s on a document giving the land away. This land is located in Jefferson County near the Washington County line at Fenn’s Bridge. Dathie, her children Mary, Joe, Betsy, grandson Joe other children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren are buried directly behind Mt. Zion AME Church in Davisboro, Georgia. (Photograph and information compliments of Mrs. Tommie Braswell Merritt)

Betsy Braswell Swint

Betsy Braswell Swint (1861-1930)

Betsy Braswell was the daughter and fourth child of Dathie Haines. Her children were Carrie, Joe, John, and Med. Betsy had a saying “Life is like a goose and I want all of my feathers”. In later years Betsy married a Mr. Swint (Photograph and information compliments of Mrs. Tommie Braswell Merritt).

William Henry Smith

William Henry Smith (1853-1929)William Henry Smith lived in the Peacock’s District of Washington County. He was a farmer, a minister who was pastor at Poplar Springs and Allford Grove Baptist Churches and was the husband of Georgia Hayes Smith. They are both buried in the Smith Family Cemetery which is an adjunct to the Bethesda Christian Church Cemetery in southwestern Washington County (Photo (by author) taken of photo provided by Mrs. Thelma Neal Smith.)

Eugene Hodges

Eugene Hodges was the youngest son of Eliza and Abel H. Eugene Hodges (1862-1942)Hodges. He was born in Washington County, Georgia and lived there until his mother’s death in 1898 when he moved to Hancock County, Georgia with his wife Mittie Trawick Hodges and child. He lived there until his death. Their children were Vinnie, Mammie, Henry, Rins, Anna, Lindsey, Dawson, Pauline, Etta, Ruth and Hiram. This photograph was taken in the front yard on his farm in Hancock County, Georgia in 1938 when he was 76 years old. He is buried in the Beulah Baptist Church Cemetery in Hancock County. Photograph provided, with sincerest appreciation, by Wendy M. Glover, his great granddaughter.

Catharine Harmon and Family

Catharine Harmon and Family Washington County GA

Shown at left are five generations of the female line of Catherine Harmon: from lower right counter clockwise are Catherine Harmon, daughter Lucy Harmon, Wynn, Batten, Lawson, Johnson, granddaughter Katie Batten Roberts, great granddaughter Mattie Mae Roberts White and great great granddaughter Sarah White. Catherine Harmon who was born about 1830 made her way on foot with her daughter Lucy born about 1853 from Virginia to Savannah and then to Washington County, Georgia. On their long journeys they endured much suffering and deprivation under the scourge of slavery. Catherine survived her ordeals and raised her family. Despite the hurtful scars on her back which oftentimes bled, she founded the first Church of God in Georgia, the Evening Light Church of God on College St. in Sandersville, Georgia in 1902. Though the exact dates of her birth and death are not known, it is known that she lived to be almost 100 years of age. (Early 1900’s photograph and information courtesy of Dr. Angela Martin from Holiness Embraces Kaolin: A History of the Church of God of Washington County, Georgia)

Pennie Hooks Harris

Pennie Hooks Harris was the daughter of Samuel (Born 1825) Pennie Hooks Harris (1858-1942)and Harriet Hooks (Born 1833). She had siblings Laura, Winnie (twin), Dillie (Dilly-twin), Jane and Susan (Susie). She was first married to Fred Brown on July 31, 1873 and they had four daughters. She later married Samuel Hiram Harris, Sr. and they had three daughters and six sons. One of Pennie’s parents was either part Creek or Cherokee and black. My older sister and brother described her as having dark skin with Indian features.

In her later years as I remember as a five-year old she lived with our family and always wore an apron. She lived in the Warthen community in Washington County, Georgia and is buried at Mineral Springs Baptist Church Cemetery. (Photographs, ancestral and biographical information courtesy of Dneva Harris Waters)

Susan Hooks Taylor

Susan Hooks Taylor Washington County GASusan Hooks Taylor was the daughter of Samuel (Born 1825) and Harriet Hooks (Born 1833). She had siblings Laura, Winnie (twin), Dillie (Dilly-twin), Jane and Pennie. She was married to Tenant Taylor and lived in the Warthen community.

David Alexander Gordon

David A. and Anna Gordon Family, Washington County GA

David A. Gordon was one of the first children born in Georgia after the Emancipation Proclamation was accepted as law. He is shown here with his young family on the porch of his home. David Alexander Gordon was one of the founders of the Washington Institute. He provided funding which made its creation possible. He was also the founder and principal of the Royal School in the Oak Grove Community. His life work is testimony to the impact that he had on his community and the effect of his work is recorded by the Historical Marker in the Oak Grove community at the site of the Royal School which he established in 1897. He is buried at the Gordon Family Cemetery (Photograph contributed by the Gordon family)

Anecdotes and Stories

Santee or Santy
Santee was born in Africa around 1751. He showed up at James Kendrick’s plantation in what is now known as Washington County. He had escaped from his holder, a Mr. Palmer of Savannah, and was found on the Kendrick’s plantation on December 8, 1781. He bore tribal scars on his cheeks and forehead and spoke with a distinctive African accent. He was reportedly about thirty (30) years of age. He was dark and stood at 5’9” tall. Though he may not have remained in “Washington County” after his discovery here, there is no doubt he remains as the first African American identified by name to have been in early Washington County. There is a slight possibility that there may have been some relationship with him and Santee McDowell who is first recorded in the Reconstruction Return of Voters in 1867. (Primary information gleaned from Elizabeth Pritchard Newsome’s Vertical Card Files, Volume K)

Deedom
Deedom is historically the oldest named African American known to have lived in Washington County, Georgia. He is listed as a freeman in the 1850 U. S. Census as being born in 1750. His guardian was Nancy Brown. It was a practice that, if a slave reached 100 years of age, then he was granted freedom.

Becky
Becky was born in 1758 and was listed as the slave of Ambrose Ray in the December 10, 1848 division of his estate. It is assumed that her husband was Bob because she was listed next to him as wife, but there was no age provided for him. Becky is the oldest African American female listed in Washington County.

Daniel and George
Daniel and George are similar historical African American figures in Washington County, Georgia because they share certain distinctions. Both were born in 1760. Daniel was born in North Carolina while George was born in Virginia. Both appear in the 1860 U. S. Census Mortality Schedule for Washington County, Georgia. Their distinction is rooted in the fact that they both died the same year at age 100 years. They are also distinguished by the fact that they both are two of the oldest identified African Americans in Washington County by name. They were both listed as field hands in the 1860 U. S. Census Mortality Schedule. Daniel died suddenly in December and George died in October after a fourteen day affliction with palsy.

Primus
Primus was born in 1765 in an unknown place. His distinction as a historical African American figure in Washington County, Georgia resides in the fact that he is identified as the oldest first African American so identified by name to have died in the County. He is listed in the 1850 U. S. Census Mortality Schedule for Washington County, Georgia.

Elizabeth Chester
Elizabeth Chester was born in 1765 in Virginia and was freed probably upon a petition by Absalom Chester. She is listed as a free person of color in the 1850 U. S. Census of Washington County, Georgia and is the matriarch of the entire African American Chester family of Washington County and is the oldest recorded free African American female known to be in Washington County.

Isaac Whitaker
Isaac Whitaker was reportedly born in 1765 in North Carolina and is listed as a free person of color in the 1850 U. S. Census for Washington County, Georgia. He is the oldest named African American male freeman to be identified in Washington County, Georgia. In William Whitaker’s will of 1837 [Baldwin County – formerly part of Washington County] there were two Isaac’s aged fifty and fifty-five years respectively. It is suspected that either one of them could be our current subject. The process by which he became free in Washington County is not known. Parts of the Whitaker family migrated to Georgia from North Carolina into Georgia during the late 1700’s.

About the Author

Adam Adolphus, Sr. is a native of Washington County, Georgia. He grew up and was educated in the public schools in River Rouge, Michigan. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan-Dearborn. He returned to Georgia in 1972 and was employed as an educator in Washington County. Since his retirement from education in Georgia, he has dedicated himself to genealogical and historical research. He serves as chair of the African American Committee of the Washington County Historical Society. He is also a member of the National Genealogy Society, The Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (Atlanta, Georgia Chapter) and the Georgia Genealogical Society. Recently, he received an award from the Georgia Association of Museums and Galleries for his work African Americans of Washington County, Georgia: From Colonial Time through Reconstruction. His book will be reviewed in the National Genealogy Society Quarterly.

To Order African Americans of Washington County, Georgia: From Colonial Time through Reconstruction

Copies of this book can be obtained from the Washington County Historical Society’s Genealogy Research Center and Old Jail Museum:

129 Jones Street

PO Box 6088

Sandersville, GA 31082

Tel 478-552-6965

E-mail: genealogyresearch@att.net

Website: http://wacogrc.org

110 comments

  • Visit site
    October 1, 2014 7:00 pmPosted 22 days ago
    Maria P. Sims

    Hi, we are researching my husband's ancestors who lived in Georgia. He does not know the county(s) or town(s) in which his great great grandfather, Gus Woods resided. However, he has a family story of the slaves being freed and Gus Woods and his son, Mac Woods, walking down a dusty road with no where to go. Mac was about 9 years old at the time. Mac later married Betty (no last name) and had Iona who married Walter Mac Lay. My respectful question(s) to you is to ask if you know of any "Woods" in Washington or any other counties that you may have researched and do you know of any plantation owners in Washington County or anywhere else in GA named "Woods". Same questions apply to "Lay".Thank you so much for helping us in our research.

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    August 16, 2014 8:39 pmPosted 2 months ago
    althea brown

    Grandaughter of david gordon

    Reply
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    August 8, 2014 11:44 pmPosted 2 months ago
    Sheila

    Hi Mr. Adolphus. I would like to know if you have any information on Silas Worthen and Sally Reynolds in Washington County, Cato County and Sanderville County Georgia. I saw Silas Worthen in your index. I am planning on getting your book when i come to Georgia

    Reply
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    August 8, 2014 12:14 amPosted 2 months ago
    Sheila_60

    Hi, after viewing your index I saw my great great grandfather Silas Worthen and family. I was wondering if you can tell me how to find them before 1870, and how to find their slave owners. thanks

    Reply
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    August 5, 2014 4:50 amPosted 2 months ago
    Earnest I. Smith

    First i thank you for all your work and research. I am a descendant of Dawson Hays(Hayes) and Henrietta Hays. After chatting with a new found cousin I found that there were/are alot of them from this area. Do you have any history on the Hays(Hayes) clan from Washington County and how far back it goes? Does the name Lees(Leedson) Dawson come up in the history? I was told he was a relatively wealthy family member who was lynched there. If you have any info I thank you in advance. PEACE.

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    August 4, 2014 8:41 pmPosted 2 months ago
    Rashad

    Good day Sir, I was wondering did you have any information on Lewis Underwood (b.1818) or his son Robert Underwood or any Underwoods?

    Reply
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    July 31, 2014 10:45 pmPosted 2 months ago
    Artafia

    MR. ADOLPHUS. thank you for this information! I wish to locate information on my father's family he was born in Davisboro, Ga. The Jordan or Jerden family. We are connecting my great grandparents Major Jordan( have picture) and Sue Jordan. Sur names,Sapp, Underwood, are also mentioned. My aunt shared some history my father was brother and first cousin to many and favored other cousins as well. It's sad but I want to know, do you have any info my grandmother Sue was Cherokee ,very dark, short,long hair and certified midwife to many. I was told she traveled with the doctors Grandfather was not buried with the Slaves perhaps he was white. As his children appeared. R

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    July 18, 2014 6:49 amPosted 3 months ago
    Sabrina Cuby-King

    This website is truly Fantastic!! I've recently been reviewing my family history. My mother, Carolyn Hodges Cuby is from Tennille and my father, Walter Norris Cuby is from Davisboro, GA. They were high school sweethearts at TJ Elder High School. My maternal grandparents are Mora Hodges and Maudie Bell Harris Hodges. He was a farmer and she was a homemaker. I was especially intrigued that one of the persons mentioned was Eugene Hodges. That's the name of my oldest uncle, my mom's brother. My paternal grandparents are Rev. Emory Cuby and Corine McMillan Cuby. He was a pastor of one of the AME churches (Neeler AME) and school bus driver. She was a teacher at DD Crawford Elementary. Our family reunion is scheduled for next week and I'll be excited to share any info you can provide. Thanks so much.

    Reply
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    June 23, 2014 12:52 pmPosted 4 months ago
    Kwalker

    Looking for Epsie Thompson should was suppose to have been a midwife in Washington and Jefferson county Georgia

    Reply
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    June 11, 2014 1:19 amPosted 4 months ago
    shutterfly.com

    I am regular reader, how are you everybody? This

    post posted at this website is truly nice.

    Reply
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      June 13, 2014 1:37 amPosted 4 months ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Hi Shutterfly,

      I thank you for your interest.

      Reply
  • Visit site
    May 10, 2014 3:09 amPosted 5 months ago
    Brenda Davis

    Mr. Adolphus,
    I'm so amazed at finding your information, and to see that you have put so much effort into helping others conduct research into their family histories. My family is made up of the Davises, Jeffersons, Bryants, Browns, and Riddles of Washington County (Sandersville and Davisboro). I know some family members lived on the Lem Sheppard (Shepherd?) plantation near Davisboro. My great-grandfather was Sim Bryant, who worked as a Pullman Porter. He was born on March 26, 1869. Thank you so much for your efforts and your generosity.

    Reply
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      May 17, 2014 2:03 amPosted 5 months ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Brenda,

      Thank you so very much for your kind and most encouraging words. All the surnames that you cite are included in the study. I did not find your great grandfather Sim Bryant in the book. The only possible area of inclusion would have been in the 1870 US Census for Washington County, but he does not appear in it.

      Reply
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    April 18, 2014 7:03 pmPosted 6 months ago
    Robbie Braswell

    Good Evening Sir,

    I'm a descendent of Brad & Laura Salem around the Davisboro's area, do you have any information on them?

    Reply
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      May 17, 2014 1:47 amPosted 5 months ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Robbie,

      Thank you for your interest. The limited information that I have in the book on Laura and Brad[Bradford] Salem is:

      Brad married Laura Hagan on December 28, 1882 with the ceremony being performed by Rev A. J. Mason.

      Brad died November 27, 1933. His father was Ephram Salem who was born @ 1832.

      Brad's mother may have been Melissa (surname unknown).

      There is more information on Ephram than on Brad.

      Reply
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    April 8, 2014 4:24 amPosted 6 months ago
    Britney McCoy

    Hi. Mr. Adolphus,

    I am so excited to have found your site and to buy your book. I am looking for more information regarding Bessie Brinson and any other Brinson history in Washington County, Georgia (specifically Davisboro)? I am very interested in any information you could provide regarding Brinson slave records. I will be reaching out and look forward to connecting further.

    Reply
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      April 8, 2014 7:09 pmPosted 6 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Britney McCoy,

      During my research, i did not come across any slave holding records for a Brinson family in Washington County. There was a W. Brinson who was a Justice of the Peace for Washington County circa 1867. The slave holding Brinson's appear to come from surrounding counties, e. g., Jefferson, Burke, Warren prior to 1870. The oldest surname Brinson African American is Demus Brinson Who was born in 1799 in Georgia and appears in the 1880 Census for Washington County, GA. It may be that the African American Brinson's came to Washington County from surrounding counties after the Civil War.

      Reply
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        April 10, 2014 2:20 amPosted 6 months ago
        Britney McCoy

        Great, thank you so much for this information. After further confirmation, I am referring to Brinsons that were on the Josey plantation in Jefferson county – specifically Wallace Brinson and Bessie Bryant (she may have not been on the plantation and is supposedly of Native American decent). Is there any info on black Brinsons in this area and if there any records of Bessie, are you able provide more on her background?

        Reply
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          April 12, 2014 3:03 pmPosted 6 months ago
          Adam Adolphus, Sr.

          Hi Britney, I thank you for your continuing interest. I do not have any information on the Josey Plantation in Jefferson County, GA. There were and are Josey' in Washington County, GA. They live primarily in the Lamb's GMD in Washington County which is adjacent to Jefferson County, GA along the Ogeechee River. Bessie Brinson does not appear in my book, but there is a Lizzie and an Eliza Brinson. The names Bessie, Eliza and Lizzie are diminutives of Elizabeth. Eliza Brinson was born about 1864 to James and Forten (Fortuna) Smith Brinson. Lizzie Brinson was born about 1883 to Tom and Caroline Reese, so Brinson is her married name. It is difficult for me to make any definitive determinations about Bessie Brinson based on the information that you have provided, e. g., I have no idea of the time she was born, lived or died. I did notice that there are several Bessie Brinson's, one of which lived in Washington County, GA. I realize that what is offered here probably is not of much help to you. With additional data from you, perhaps more can can be gleaned.

          Reply
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    April 1, 2014 2:26 pmPosted 6 months ago
    Lillie Rushin

    Mr. Adolphus,

    KUDOS – I think you have done a great job and hope you continue. I will be doing some additional research on your material. I am originally from Washington County and I live in Decatur, GA.

    Keep up the good work.

    Reply
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      April 4, 2014 2:56 pmPosted 6 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi Lillie,

      Thank you so much for your continued interest. It is sincerely appreciated.

      Reply
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    March 27, 2014 8:42 pmPosted 7 months ago
    Reggie

    Hi
    This book really sound like it could have a lot of great infomation. I was wondering do you know if it has much on the Pool/poole and the Hall family

    Reply
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      April 4, 2014 2:54 pmPosted 6 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi Reggie,

      There are 67 Pool/Poole surname entries and 138 Hall surname entries. If you click on Index 1 above, you can see which Pool/Poole and Hall surname individuals are included. Most of the African Americans with surnames are derived from data from the 1870 and 1880 US Censuses with others coming from other records prior to the taking of the Census. There are thousands of individuals with given names only. Those given name only individuals date back to the late 1700's. The data was derived from newspapers, church records, bibles, family histories and several other resources. If you look at the table of contents, you will be able to see more specifically the source of the data. Additionally by comparing the page numbers of individuals in the index with the table of contents, you can find out more specifically the source of the data.

      Reply
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    March 22, 2014 5:26 amPosted 7 months ago
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      April 4, 2014 2:58 pmPosted 6 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi,

      Thank you for your interest.

      Reply
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    March 7, 2014 6:35 pmPosted 7 months ago
    kcirym2vp

    Good Evening Mr. Adolphus,

    I am the descendant of Dathie Haines and Betsy Braswell Swint (eighth or ninth, maybe even tenth or eleventh generation). I along with a few of my siblings would like to visit Davisboro within the next couple of month's to do some research. We would like to know the history of our people (that which is unknown to us), and see that you have done a fantastic job in researching the history of so many families. The last time that I recall visiting Davisboro, was about 29 years ago. I do remember visiting Mt.Zion AME Church and the cemetery where alot of our ancestors are/were laid to rest. However I was too young to understand the struggle of my people then, as I greatly appreciate and would like to venture more into the knowledge of those who struggled and made it possible for me and my kids to be today. If it is at all possible with your help, I would like to know where to begin in our search? As this will be the first visit for me in a long time, but as for me siblings who were there in 1996 during a family reunion which I missed will be a refreshed visit for them to do research for themselves. If you are able to help in any way it will be greatly appreciated, and we look forward to visiting soon!!!

    The Braswell-Daniel Family Line

    Reply
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      March 10, 2014 4:04 amPosted 7 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi Braswell-Daniel Family Line, Thank you for your interest and I wish you success in discovering your Washington County ancestry. The Braswell and Daniel families have long history in Washington County and both families are filled with distinction. I will be happy to assist you in any way that I can.

      Reply
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    March 4, 2014 12:53 pmPosted 7 months ago
    Shilita Wisdom

    Hello my name is Shilita, I am a descendent of Dathie Haines and Betsy Swint. I come from the Sallie Bell Daniel/Nathaniel Braswell line. I am trying to obtain more information for myself and family wanting to truly know our historical facts. If you can help please let me know…

    Reply
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      March 10, 2014 3:53 amPosted 7 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi Shilita, I will be happy to help in your search as much as I am capable. There is a photograph of Nathaniel Braswell in a Haines/Braswell family photograph which was provided by a Braswell family member. The current patriarch of the Braswell family still resides in Washington County and is in his 90's and is quite lucid. If there is particular information that you seek, please contact me via e-mail at genealogyresearch@att.net. I thank you for your interest in my work.

      Reply
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        July 25, 2014 5:34 amPosted 3 months ago
        Haines/Haynes Family

        Hello, my name is Sandra. I am a descendent of Dathie Haines. Her daughter Wash Haines is my mother Inez Haynes(88 yrs old) grandmother. I would like for Shilita Wisdom and kcrym2vp to contact me via email at gail6js@aol.com. The Haines/Haynes family have had several family reunions and I would love to connect. My mother and I will be traveling to Atlanta, GA next month (Aug 2014)

        Reply
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    February 20, 2014 2:04 pmPosted 8 months ago
    Sharon Landers Gundy

    Sharon Landers Gundy,
    I came across this site and wow! I am trying to find any information on my grandfather (Jimmy Barlow and wife Butell smith Barlow). My mother Shirley Landers told me she had no information about his family. It was mentioned that he arrived in Harrison, Georgia by train. The train brought him from Tampa, FL. He worked on the Price's Plantation possibly in Pringle, GA. It would give me great pleasure to be able to share any findings about my grandfather. Thanks in advance

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      March 10, 2014 3:45 amPosted 7 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Hi Sharon, You pose a question that I am unable to answer because I don't have a time frame from which to search for answers. If you could provide more information such as the approximate birthdate of Jimmy Barlow, perhaps I could find some specific information for you. In my book there are two surnamed Barlow's – Elsey and Mary. Mary Barlow married Adolphus Halams on December 28, 1882. Elsey Barlow was born in 1870 and died on July 12, 1924. Elsey's parents were Irase Canty and Ann Wiggins which indicates that she married a Barlow. No African American Barlow's are listed in the 1870 US Census for Washington County, Georgia. There are Barlow's who still live in Washington County. My great aunt Lucy Hooks married Eldridge Barlow and they moved to Philadelphia and raised their family there.

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    February 14, 2014 8:06 pmPosted 8 months ago
    Brenda Richardson

    Adam Adolphus
    I came across your site and was all smiles, taken in by the photos and narratives. This is very interesting and I love it. I notice to that you were born and raised in River Rouge, Michigan. I have family living in River Rouge and in my teens, when going to Michigan to visit, we would always say we're going to the Rouge. I am into Genealogy, have been for several years. I come from a line of Smith's 1800’s from Savannah, Ga. I never knew my Grandmother Mary Lou Smith-Wilburn's side of the family. She married into the Wilburn side, which my father is a Wilburn from Macon, Ga. I leaned from a cousin on the Smith line, now deceased, that my grandmother’s name was Mary Lou and her maiden name was Smith. I started tracing her line and haven’t had much luck. I don’t know Mary Lou’s fathers name, but I do have her mother and two of her sister’s names and not sure how children there were in the family. Even if you’re not connected to this line, I love your site and it inspires me to keep working hard to find my people.

    Brenda

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      February 16, 2014 4:35 amPosted 8 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Brenda Richardson,

      Thank you for visiting the site and I am most gratified by your comments. The Rouge has a special place in my heart as it is a remarkable place having been a haven for the waves of migrants as was my family from throughout the south during the "great migration." The Smith family was a large clan in River Rouge and one family was my neighbor. The Wilburn family was not as well known to me. After I moved from River Rouge, I kind of kept tract of what was going on there and recall Kenneth(?) Wilburn who became an NBA star from the mighty Panthers basketball squads over many years. Let me wish you continued success in discovering more about your ancestry.

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    February 9, 2014 12:34 pmPosted 8 months ago
    Lynne Harrison

    Hi, Have you run across any Mays in your reasearch? My great great grandmother is Annie Mays Wilbon Born 1868 in Washington Georgia and Died 24 October 1948 in Statesboro Georgia. She was married to Adolphus Wilbon Jr.

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      February 16, 2014 4:20 amPosted 8 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Lynne Harrison,

      Thank you for visiting this site. I have not come across anyone with the surname Mays or Wilbon in Washington County, Georgia. There is a difference between Washington County with the county seat in Sandersville, Georgia and the town of Washington which is the county seat of Wilkes County, Georgia. People who are not familiar with the area often mistake one for the other. Adolphus is a common given name in Georgia while my surname is Adolphus. I wish I could have been of more assistance to you in your search.

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    February 3, 2014 10:25 pmPosted 8 months ago
    Thurman A. Harmon

    I supposedly is one of Catherine Harmon's great great grandsons, Thurman Harmon, can you tell me what is the full heritage of my great Grandmother, I was told too was part Indian, is this true. Thurman Harmon

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      February 7, 2014 11:35 pmPosted 8 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Thurman,

      The information on Catharine Harmon came from a book by Angela Martin called "Holiness Embraces Kaolin – The history of the Church of God in Washington County" and appeared in my book with her permission. A copy of the book is located in Genealogy Research Center and Old Jail Museum of the Washington County Historical Society in Sandersville, Georgia. Angela Martin resides in Alabama and is also a descendant of Catharine Harmon. I think she may be a source of information for you.

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    February 2, 2014 5:55 pmPosted 8 months ago
    MzWrightNow

    Greetings Mr. Adolphus,

    I recently re-joined ancestry.com and last week found my grandmother on the 1940 census, Marena Harris, with daughters: Mary Helen Harris, Katherine Harris, and Corine Harris (my mother, whose name was Corrine Brown). My grandmother was born Rena M. (Mae) Clay, born to Charlie and Hagar Clay (confirmed by 1910 census). In the 1920 census, she is recorded as living with Bill and Mollie Brown, a couple who identified my grandmother as Rena Mae Brown, along with her sister Leitha (Letha) Brown. I have not found any record in 1930, which should indicate my grandmother with her daughter, my aunt Mary Helen, born in 1925. Specifically, I am looking for a documents that show my grandmother's name change from Rena Mae Clay to Marena Harris; the name of her husband; my mother's father (I don't know whether he is a Harris, Brown, or neither). Over twenty years ago, I tried to get a copy of my mother's birth certificate under the name, Corrine Brown, born in 1935–no such record existed. I had to get her school record in Philadelphia-which lists her as Corrine Brown-in order to obtain a social security number for her before she died in 2001. Now that I found her listed as Corine Harris, not Brown, is there a way to get her birth record? Can you offer any other suggestions to help me in my search for my grandmother in 1930? Also, I am trying to find out what happen to her parents, my great-grandparents. I am so pleased to have come across your information, and will be purchasing the book. My goal is to visit Washington County this summer, and hope to have an opportunity to meet you. -Debra Powell-Wright

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      February 7, 2014 11:26 pmPosted 8 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Ms Powell-Wright,

      Thank you for your interest in my book and your query for locating documents concerning your grandmother. What you are asking is quite a challenge. The Washington County Historical Society's Genealogy research Center and Old Jail Museum has a volume which provides considerable data pertaining to births and deaths in Washington County, Georgia during the period (1927-1937) which may have information about your mother's birth if she was born in Washington County, GA. As for documentation for your grandmother's whereabouts in Washington County in 1930, I was able to find a Marian Harris (age 27)living in the Hodges District of Washington County, GA in the same house with a Nancy Trawick (age 47) per the 1930 US Census. Marian could be a corruption of the spelling of Marena? If so, then there may be a relationship between the two women. Perhaps a look at the families and/or individuals living in the neighborhood could offer you a clue about Marena's origins and relations. You could also employ the same technique for 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1940. If you visit Washington County, take the opportunity to visit the Probate Court and review the volumes of Marriage records on file (in bound volumes-indexed) for marriage records for the period of concern. The Genealogy Research Center and the Court House are across the street from each other. I will be most happy to be afforded the opportunity to meet with you upon your visit.

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    January 6, 2014 4:46 amPosted 9 months ago
    Adam Adollphus, Sr.

    Gary,

    Thank you for visiting this site. I certainly appreciate everything that you have done for me in the past and I am most grateful for it.

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    January 4, 2014 7:14 pmPosted 9 months ago
    Gary Sullivan

    Adam: thanks for directing me to this site that shows the hard work that you have done. Awesome. —Gary Hodges Sullivan, grandson of Hugh Hodges, Milledgeville, decendent of Able Hodges Sr.

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    December 31, 2013 2:11 amPosted 9 months ago
    Tykiesha

    Hi,
    My great grandmother was from Macon and my grandfather was from sanders vile ga their names are Eddie hooks and Louise Williams I'm trying to trace my family history

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      January 6, 2014 4:44 amPosted 9 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Tykeisha,

      It is difficult to provide guidance based on the information you have provided. If you could provide some date information, perhaps more effective information could be gleaned.

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    November 29, 2013 3:17 amPosted 10 months ago
    Kemba

    Good day,

    I am interested in finding out more information about Susan Hooks Taylor. I believe she may be one of my ancestors based on the above information provided but need some additional information to properly confirm. Where were you able to obtain information about Susan and her sister? Is there any additional information that you can share with me about her?

    Thank you

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      January 6, 2014 4:41 amPosted 9 months ago
      Adam Adolphus, Sr.

      Kemba,

      I am sorry for the delay in responding to you. I thought I had, but apparently the reply was lost in transmission. The information on and the photographs of both were provided by a descendant, Mrs. Harris Waters. If you would provide your contact information via e-mail at the Washington County Historical Society, I will forward your contact information to her. The Historical Society's e-mail is: genealogyresearch@att.net

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    November 14, 2013 3:31 pmPosted 11 months ago
    Kevin

    Mr. Adolphus,

    I am thankful to find this site. I would love to have a copy of your book how would I obtain a copy? Also my mother's side of the family is from Sandersville. My mom was born ad raised there and went to Elder High School. I've been running into a lot of roadblocks in my research. Baxton Jordan and his parents, Ike Poole and His parents. Some Renfroes as well. Any help would be awesome for my research. Thanks!

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      November 24, 2013 5:22 amPosted 11 months ago
      Adam L Adolphus

      Hi Kevin, I thank you for your interest in my book. It can be obtained by sending a check for $55.00 (includes S& H) to the Washington County Historical Society Genealogy Research Center, PO Box 6088, Sandersville, GA 31082. It is difficult to provide definitive genealogical information based only on a name or two with no particular time periods. I did come across a Baxton Jordan (B. @ 1876) whose parents are Ad (B @ 1853) and Nancy (B @ 1855) with their other children: Agustaan ( B @1872), Bob (B @1873) and Franklin (B @ 1878) – all from the 1880 US Census for Washington County, GA 127th sub district of the 100th GMD. It also appears that Ad Jordan must have lost his wife Nancy sometime between 1880 and 1890. The 1890 Census for the 100th GMD of Washington County, GA shows that he is married to Georgian (B @ 1865) with children: Gusty A. [Agustaan?] (b @1872), Robert [Bob?] (b @1873), Baxton (B @1877), Franklin (B @1878), Willie (male B@ 1882), Claudie (B @1883), Virgil (B @ 1888), Willie (female B @ 1889) and Georgia (B @1889). As for the Poole and Renfroe components of you family, I could not make any firm identification based on the information given.

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        December 7, 2013 2:42 amPosted 10 months ago
        Lena White

        Hello Mr. Adolphus,
        My auntie purchased your book and gifted it to me earlier this year and the quest began. We have been researching my great-grandmother's family. Augustaan Jordan was her mother. I am excited to see the information posted from the 1890 Census for Washington County, GA Clays District. So, her grandfather (Adam Jordan) had other children with Georgian Swint and/or Margaret Clay whom he married both in the same year (1890). In the 1900 Census, Ad Jordan is married to Margaret Clayton and they have a mixed family. I have been unable to locate Willie, Claudie, Virgil, Willie, and Georgia Jordan you mentioned from the 1890 census. Is this 1890 Census information available for me to look through to trace the Jordan/Pool side also. You and my mother are related, and that work is detailed on ancestry (on her father's side). Her grandmother was Mattie (Adolphus) Trawick. I would love to make contact with you to further my research. Thank you, and look forward to hearing from you.

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          December 16, 2013 9:22 pmPosted 10 months ago
          Adam L Adolphus

          Lena,
          It is good to hear from you. The information you relate is most informative and I am also eager to learn more. I am reluctant to place my personal contact information on this forum. You can contact me at genealogyresearch@att.net by citing my name and including a note asking that your contact information be forwarded to me. A second way is through my family tree on Ancestry.com (Adolphus-Patterson Family Tree_2012… using my profile (aawcga2011) to contact me anonymously. I will respond to you. The 1890 Census for Washington County, Georgia is housed at the Washington County, Georgia Courthouse Probate Office (original census) and at the Washington County, Georgia Historical Society Genealogy Research Center (a transcribed record) in Sandersville, Georgia 31082.

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    October 25, 2013 12:09 amPosted 12 months ago
    Cheryl White

    Hi Mr . Aldolphus,
    after viewing your page i find that you have done some outstanding work. Washington County Georgia is where my history start's and it starts with Frisom Clark born in the late 1700"s to the early 1800's . My plans is to visit Washington County to see just what I may find. Does your book cover the plantations that was in Washington County ? Ive been reasearching my family line and Washington County is where the road stops for me. I would like to be an outstanding researcher like yourself . Ive been doing Genealogy for some time now and I really believe in the past , the present and the future. it tells so much. I will be obtaining a copy of your book ,

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      November 5, 2013 4:25 amPosted 11 months ago
      Adam L Adolphus

      Hi Cheryl,
      Thank you so much for your kind words and interest in my work. There are a few plantations mentioned in the book. Most of the material is focused on the individuals found in official individual estate records such as inventories, appraisements, sales, property divisions, wills and records of returns (vouchers). Information about other individuals comes from a variety of other sources such as church minutes, family histories, newspapers of the period, bible records, census and tax records and other miscellaneous sources. I feel that research never ends because information can simply fall into your lap. For example, I had been searching for a death record for my paternal great grandfather for over twelve years and found it just this past summer. His name is Harvey Adolphus, but his record was recorded as Harvy Dalphas in the vital records of the State of Michigan during the period from 1921-1952. I had requested the record from the State of Michigan and the Wayne County, Michigan Department of Health. They reported that they had no such record even with the alternate spelling for Adolphus as Dolphus for years 1920-1930. Fortunately, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints indexed the Michigan death records for 1921-1952 and I was able to browse them online. I was looking for Dolphus, but Dalphas showed up and there it was with his place of birth in Milled[ge]ville, Ga with spouse Georgie (Georgia), father Harvy and mother Gincy Rodgers the latter two whose names I had no clue. Never ever give up your search.

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    September 6, 2013 7:41 pmPosted 1 year ago
    KB Graves

    Greetings,

    My family is also from Washington/Wilkes, GA. The Hill family and the Graves family. My oldest Hill ancestors are Joseph Hill, Dorcas Jenkins Hill. My oldest Graves ancestors are Wade Graves and Mary Evans Graves; Will Graves and Essie Mae Harris Graves. I also have Kennedy family in Washington, GA. Oldest ancestors are John Kennedy I and Ida Stone, John Kennedy II and Lillie Mae Kennedy Hill. If anyone has any information on any of these people I'd be open to sharing.

    KB Graves
    Kgraves20@liberty.edu

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      September 20, 2013 3:37 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      KB Graves,

      I have no familiarity with your family from Wilkes County, Georgia [County seat - city of Washington]. Sandersville is the county seat for Washington County. There are no surnamed individuals with the given names that you mentioned in my book. I am sorry that I could not be of more assistance to you.

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    September 1, 2013 8:49 pmPosted 1 year ago
    ALI SALAHUDDIN

    MY NAME IS PHILIP DIXON. MY FAMILY CAME TO PHILADELPHIA FROM SANDERSVILLE AROUND 1920. MY GRANDFATHER WAS CHARLIE DIXON AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS SALLIE CHEEVES. DO YOU HAVE ANY INFO ON EITHER FAMILY?

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      September 5, 2013 2:02 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Phillip (Ali Salhuddin),
      I have not done particular research on the Dixon family, but I do have some familiarity with the Cheeves family. Horace and Denise N. Cheeves have done some magnificent work on the Carter, Cheeves, Boyer, Hooks, Butts, Trawick, Gordy and Dawson families. Their publications are both genealogical – "Legacy Archives, Vol I" and specific to land holdings – "Legacy Archives, Vol II."

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    September 1, 2013 4:05 amPosted 1 year ago
    Lynette

    HI Mr. Adolphus,
    I too, share the excitement the other writers have expressed. I am the great-great-great granddaughter of Samuel Trawick. I live in Marietta and saw several (I think) familiar names listed in your excerpt. The Dr. Hodges listed in your book – was his middle name Coss? My great aunt Anne would talk of the Ennis family so it was interesting to see their name on a document as well. I am excited to order your book and can't wait to delve into it. I cannot express my gratitude for your hard work and dedication to this project. I would also love to know how the family came to acquire so much land in Baldwin County. Best wishes…

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      September 5, 2013 2:35 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Lynette,
      I am the gg grandson of John (Jack) Trawick, the brother of Ben and Sam Trawick. I believe that those three brothers are the sons of Disso "Trawick" who was in Washington County (now Hancock County) as early as 1794. I really don't know what the C in Henry C. Hodges' name stands for. I have seen it to be Cherry and Campbell. The Ennis family land holdings in the Salem District of Baldwin County came initially from the Whitaker family holdings and then to Shinholsters and then to the Ennis family. The best I can determine, either Sam or Ben (or both) purchased the land and it was subsequently divided between their heirs. John (Jack) (1827-1922) moved to Hancock County @ 1880. I thank you for your interest in my book and I hope it does not disappoint..

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  • August 30, 2013 11:55 pmPosted 1 year ago
    @OurGeorgiaRoots

    Hi Adolphus,

    I'm Luckie Daniels, a genealogist researching my Ancestors of Washington-Wilkes (www.OurGeorgiaRoots.com) and Henry-Barbour-Houston Counties (www.OurAlabamaRoots.info). My primary Alabama family lines are BARWICK, WIGGINS and McKENZIE. I'm interested in the BARWICK and WIGGINS families that lived in Washington County GA and migrated to Henry County AL in the late 1820s. I'm hoping to locate any slave owner/slave documentation that might shed light on my 4th Grandfather's (Cary BARWICK b. 1830 AL) lineage. I'm also curious to know if there's a connection between the BARWICK and TRAWICK lines and if the DAWSONS of Washington County might be connected to the DAWSON/DORSEY line of WARREN County? How might I purchase your book? It seems all my lines GA and AL are actually one in the same!:)

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      August 31, 2013 8:53 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Hi Luckie, thank you for your interest in my work. I visited your two sites for Georgia and Alabama. My paternal great grandmother is Patsy Wiggins who has a brother Calvin, on whom I don't really have any information save a Freedman's Bank Record (for Anderson Wiggins – from Baldwin County, GA) which lists their mother, father, siblings and half siblings (Dawson's). Patsy Wiggins (Dawson) married George Trawick, the son of John and Sarah Devereaux Trawick. The extent of the connection between families has yet to be fathomed. The names of the slaves and their holders, ,buyers, hirers, etc can be seen in the two Indexes listed above (pdf). The list is as comprehensive as I could make based on available sources. You can obtain a copy of the book – citing the title – by mailing a check for $55 (includes S&H) to: The Washington County Historical Society, PO Box 6088, Sandersville, GA 31082.

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    August 18, 2013 3:38 amPosted 1 year ago
    Adam Adolphus

    Jeffrey, thank you for your kind words. Eliza was a mystery to me when I first began research. Family oral tradition had her known only as "Ma." She was described as being a very beautiful woman and it is also said that she was part Indian (DNA tests have shown that to be the case). As I searched for more information, i chose to call her the "Black Cherokee Rose." As best I know, no one else had used that designation for her. Her daughter, Georgia Anne ( my great grandmother ) told her children and grand children about her and the talents she possessed. There is one photograph of her and Abel's last and youngest child, Eugene Hodges. Abel lost his life during the Civil War at Antietam on September 17, 1862. Eliza died on March 14, 1898 in Washington County at age 66. The first historical reference to her, if fully believe, is an estate inventory from 1837 in Baldwin County, Georgia. I also believe that I have enough information that determines how she got to Washington County and became a part of the slave holdings of Abel Hodges, Sr. and also how she eventually made her way back to Baldwin County and Finally returning to Washington County. There are some other details that are also available.

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    August 13, 2013 3:39 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Jeffrey Oster

    Dear Mr. Adolphus:
    I was quite pleased to find this webpage while searching through some records online to augment and add to some genealogy research I have done in the past. I believe we are related, albeit distant. My great grandmother was Texan (A.K.A. "Texie", "Texas") Fields, the daughter of Abitha ("Bythy") Hodges and Henry Fields. As I am sure you may know, Abitha was the daughter of Eliza Hodges, whom I believe is the same one to which you refer in the dedication of your book. Texie's son Johnny Kneece was my maternal grandfather. His daughter, Carol Kneece, was my mother. Texie is buried adjacent to Johnny in Vaucluse, S.C.
    I am a native of Aiken County, S.C., in the Horse Creek Valley area (encompassing Graniteville, Warrenville, Langley, Bath and Clearwater), now commonly referred to as Midland Valley. Back in 1993, prior to the widespread advent of the internet, I began my geneology research at the U.S. Archives in Waltham, MA (I had moved to New England years before), and the search revealed much about my heritage. Largely through census reports, I was able to trace my mother's line all the way back to Abel Hodges (Jr., I presume), but could only surmise from the free and slave census reports that Abitha (listed as "Mulatto") was the offspring of Abel and one of his female slaves. I don't recall Eliza being listed as his wife, but I would have to go back and check that detail. That she was known as the "Black Cherokee Rose" I find intriguing and something of which I was unaware. I do plan on ordering your book, but I was wondering in the interim if you could offer some insight on this part of my heritage of which I am unaware and have not found as of yet.
    Thank you for all of the work you have done to preserve this heritage for not only surviving descendants, but for future generations as well. I have a daughter and a grandson, and I would very much like to pass on as much about their legacy as I can.
    Fond regards,
    Jeffrey Oster

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    August 10, 2013 2:33 amPosted 1 year ago
    Shea

    Hello Mr. Aldolphus,
    I sort of ran across your page during my search and wondered if you were familiar with any
    Reeves from Washinghton County or any surrounding counties of Baldwin, Pike o others.
    I am seaching for my Ancestor Simon Reeves descendants from your area and surrounding areas.
    Thank you for your time Sir. Shea

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      August 18, 2013 3:15 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Shea, thank you for your interest. There are many members of the Reeves and Reaves families in Washington and its surrounding counties. I have no detailed information about any of the families. I have heard the name Simon Reeves before a very long time ago. My book has information on 23 Reaves and 39 Reeves. There are about 5 additional names with variations on the spelling of Reaves or Reeves.

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    August 5, 2013 7:18 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Carrie L Collins

    I am doing a study on the McBride Family. Do you have any information?

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      August 18, 2013 3:03 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Carrie, The McBride family is extensive in Washington County. Look in Index 1 above for the names of McBride family members. There are about 30 of them referenced.

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    August 4, 2013 8:21 amPosted 1 year ago
    Kenneth Duncan

    I was told my great great grandfather James O Duncan was born in Sandersville Ga or Washington County and my Great grandfather Otis Duncan and his wife Lillie M Duncan lived in Baldwin or Jones County my parents James Duncan and Rosa Lee Duncan lived in Haddock, Gray and Round Oak Ga. Would you have any info on the familes I was also told my grandfather moved to Ohio I don't know the city, I only met my greatgrand father once before he moved to West Palm Beach Fla.and owned his taxi service there. I currently live in Macon GA.

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      August 18, 2013 2:48 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Kenneth, a cursory search did not yield any absolute leads from the information you gave. Duncan is a relatively common name and there are many possibilities to review to identify your ancestors. Your own family (the older members) probably have the information that you seek. I am currently working on a Baldwin County manuscript, but at this juncture, I cannot say that I have any information of particular interest or applicability to your family.

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    August 4, 2013 8:08 amPosted 1 year ago
    KENNETH DUNCAN

    I was told James O Duncan my great great grandfather was born and lived in Sandersville, and my grandfather Otis Duncan move to eitherJones or Baldwin County, and lived in Gray Ga before moving to Bibb County ( Macon Ga )

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    August 1, 2013 3:56 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Adam Adolphus

    Hi Deidra,

    The Trawick brothers – John (Jack), Ben and Samuel were prolific and their offspring stretch across the United States and beyond. I believe that their father was named Disso who was held in bondage by Jessie Trawick as early as 1794 in Hancock County (previously Washington County). I am a direct descendant of the Dawson's (Wiggin's), Hooks' and Trawick's. All of the other surnames that you list are connected together in various ways. I look forward to the opportunity to meet with you.

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    July 30, 2013 2:52 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Deidra L. Fryer

    HI Mr Adolphus,

    I am elated to find your site. We just held our 2013 Cousin Connection Family Reunion in the Maryland/ DC Area. We have 12 surnames from Washington County but are not sure how all of us a directly related other than cousins. those names are Barlow, Butts, Carter, Cheeves, Dawson, Douglas, Gordy, Hooks, Renfow, Renfroe, Smith, Trawick, (Travick). I believe I have found the parents of my Great, Great Grandmother (Camellia Trawick Dawson) She appears in the 1870 Census as the daughter of Benjamin Trawick at age 14 named (Canada?). We did not know who her parents were but knew she was connected to these Trawicks. I am ordering your book today to see if I can get some further confirmation that is her. IN the 1880 Census she is married to Ike (Issac) Dawson and they appear in the Census twice once with their children (2), my Great Grand mother (Sallie Dawson Douglas) and near Ben Trawick. The other listing is with white residences, which I am assuming they worked for with no children. I am ordering your book today to see what else I can find out about my foreparents and to continue to write a through history of our people. I also found out that John (Jack), Ben and Samuel Trawick – (Brothers)were voters in 1867 from an ancestry.com document. Does that mean they were land holders.

    We have one family member that wrote the Books Legacy (Horace Cheeves) which traces the history of the Kaolin land being stolen from the Carter Clan. I plan to come to Milledgeville for a graduation and come over to Sandersville around Dec 12, 2013 I hope I can get a chance to meet with you when I come.
    Thanks
    Deidra L. Fryer

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      August 1, 2013 3:46 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Hi A. Martin,

      I am truly most gratified that you enjoyed my book. As best I can determine Henry Stephen's parents are Mack and Emma Mathis Stephens. At present I don't have any information about any possible siblings. Sarah Hodges's parents are Able H. and Eliza (?) Hodges. Her siblings are Abitha Hodges Fields, Eugenia Hodges, Howard Hodges, Georgia Anne Hodges Adolphus, and Eugene Hodges. Her other possible siblings (father unknown) are: Charley Hodges, Sherlock Hodges, Jeff Hodges, "Dump" Hodges and "Termanda" (Amanda?) Hodges. [you can contact me directly via aawcga2011/Rootsweb & Ancestry.com].

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    July 23, 2013 10:55 amPosted 1 year ago
    a martin

    I enjoyed reading the book, African Americans of Washington County, Georgia: From Colonial Times through Reconstruction and Washington County Historical Society Book. I am a great-great granddaughter of Henry Stephens and Sarah J. Hodges Stephens. I am also a great granddaughter of Aaron Harden and Roxanne Stephens Harden.They were either born and/or lived in Washington County, Georgia. I would like to know how could, I find out about the parents, brothers and sisters of Henry Stephens, Sarah J. Hodges Stephens and Aaron Harden. Thank-you.

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    July 18, 2013 9:30 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Adam Adolphus

    Gloria, Thank you for your sentiments about the book. I am unfamiliar with your family as indicated from Washington, Georgia. Washington (the city/town) is the county seat of Wilkes County, Georgia. Washington County's seat is Sandersville. People who are not familiar with this area often get the two mixed up (the county vis-a-vis the city/town). Washington County and Wilkes County are fairly close together only being separated by the two relavtively small counties of Warren and Taliaferro.

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    July 5, 2013 4:42 amPosted 1 year ago
    Gloria

    This is excellent and I must have this book. My great grandparents are from Washington, Georgia. Their names were Clarabell and Peyton (P. A.) Samuels. It's really confusing here in the north because Peyton also went by "Alfred" and "Sam". Clarabell's maiden name was Hughly and in the home was the mother of either Peyton or Clara and her name was Sarah born around 1836. Clara is buried I believe behind the Gibson Grove Baptist Church. By any chance do you know of this family? I live in Lansdowne, PA and have never traveled south. I was always raised to believe Clarabell was seminole, but census says she was black.

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    July 2, 2013 12:14 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Adam Adolphus

    Tabitha, my book has the following information on Prince Macklin: (1) He was married on January 17, 1884 to Becky [Rebecca] Dixon in Washington County, GA by Rev W. J. Stevens (2) His death certificate shows that he died on March 19, 1925, he was born @ 1852 and his mother's name is Annie. (3) The only other Macklin listed in the book is Peter Macklin who the books shows that he voted in July 1867. [There are no slave holders with the surname Macklin in my book. However, I can say definitively that there were several white Macklin families in neighboring Baldwin and Hancock Counties, GA] My book lists 23 slaves with given name of Prince and 6 slaves with the given name Annie – additionally there are 84 slaves with the given name of Ann. Outside of my book, I found one reference to Walter and Susie Dixon in the 1920 US Census for the Stonewall District of Washington County, Georgia [the district surrounds the city of Harrison which is about 10 miles SE of Sandersville] with the following information: Walter and Susie are married and are both 60 years old and their children are listed as: Winnie (19), Mattie (16), Edie (14), Eva (12), William (9), Louis (6) and Hugh (3). I don't have any other specific information about your particular Macklin and Dixon families. I do remember your visit to the Genealogy Research Center and Old Jail Museum. I wish you success in search of your heritage.

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      November 5, 2013 12:20 amPosted 11 months ago
      Tabitha Paulk

      Thanks!!! If you do come across any additional information you can email me at cjstowing@windstream.net
      My address is 1095 Gus Paulk Road, Ambrose, GA 31512. Where can I find any photo's?

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      November 5, 2013 12:26 amPosted 11 months ago
      Tabitha

      Walter and Susie are my great grand mothers (Mattie) parents

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    June 30, 2013 4:39 amPosted 1 year ago
    Tabitha

    My great, great, great grandfather was Prince Macklin, I saw his name on the slave list that you had. My family lived in Sandersville at one point in their life. His wife was Rebecca Macklin. I think that his son was Walter Dixon and his wife was Susie Bell Dixon. Walter was a Indian and was disowned by his family because he married a black woman. I think I met you last year when I took my grandmother to the heritage place to try and look up information on her family. If you have any information on my family please let me know.

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    June 11, 2013 3:45 amPosted 1 year ago
    Deby

    Hi,

    When you were doing your research, did you find a marriage certificate for Sam Tra(y)wick and Fannie? Also, would the county have marriage records that were not indexed? I've checked Ancestry.com, Family search.org and the Georgia archives and found nothing for them .

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      June 14, 2013 3:56 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Deby, I did not specifically look for a marriage license for Sam and Fannie Tra(y)wick. All of Washington County's Marriage records are indexed and many can now be seen on-line at the Georgia Secretary of State's Archives site (Virtual Vault): http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us:8888/index.php Some can also be seen on Familysearch.org, but they are more difficult to access. Sam(uel) and Fannie Traywick appear as family #133 in the 1870 US Census for Washington County, Georgia in the 98th GMD which is located adjacent to Baldwin County, Georgia. In that census their ages are shown as 30 and 31 years old respectively. In the same household are: Morgan (16 yrs), Dock (14 yrs), Rolla (15 yrs), Mark (10 yrs), Georgia (10 yrs) and Laura (9 yrs) Traywick. I looked in the Washington County records. Marriage Record C (1860-1872) has no record for a marriage for Sam & Fannie. Marriage Record D (1879-1885) has a marriage Record for Sam Trawick and Rosetta Levich on page 240. It is possible that Sam and Fannie's marriage occurred during slavery and there is no record of it. They could also have been married after slavery in Baldwin County (the first records are not online, but at the Baldwin County Courthouse) or in Hancock County (thought the records are online, they are not indexed. Looking at the 1870 Census, it appears that Sam is either the brother of John Trawick (born 1822) or his son. Family stories indicate that there were three brothers – John, Sam and Ben and that they are the forebears of all the Trawicks in the area. I believe that their father was Disso "Trawick", but I have no proof of that deduction. The other trawicks in the household are probably not Sam and Fannie's children if their ages are correct, but one cannot definitely verify their ages. I wish that I could provide you with more information, but that is all that I have about marriage.

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        June 16, 2013 5:26 amPosted 1 year ago
        Deby

        Thank you for taking the time to reply in such detail. I've looked at the Georgia archives site repeatedly, to make sure I hadn't missed anything. I found Sam And Rosetta (that Sam is probably Ben's son). I also think, like you do, that John, Sam and Benj are brothers and that Disso may be their father. I'm going to be driving through Georgia soon. I am going to have to schedule a stop in Baldwin County. If I find anything, I'll let you know. Thanks again for being so generous with your time. Deby.

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    June 5, 2013 4:52 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Adam Adolphus

    Maria, there are large numbers of Mills and Pooles (Pools) in Washington County, but none of the names you mention are listed in my book. There a few Stewards (Stewarts) and Palmers listed, but none with the given names you provided. You don't indicate any time frames for the subjects of your inquiry.

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    May 14, 2013 11:55 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Maria Reid-Nkpadobi

    I have been reading some of your pieces I am trying to locate Mills,Steward and Poole Sip Mill aka Julian Mills all from washington county My grandmother was Wylena Palmer she married Julian Mills Jr

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    May 6, 2013 2:00 amPosted 1 year ago
    Jesse W. Gardner

    I was elated when I stumbled upon this site. I have a census record for my great-great-grand parents that contains names of all (I think) of their children. Their names were Samuel and Leecia Andrews and I saw them and children listed in the "view index 1" tab. My final goal is to find out where they came from going back to Africa. Will the Index # 2 (tax, slave holder,etc.) tell me from where and by whom they were sold? In addition, how do I access the Washington County Tax Digest? By computer, writing, or by actually going to the Genealogy Research Center? Will going to the research center give me the best results? I appreciate any help you can give me.

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      June 5, 2013 4:34 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam Adolphus

      Jesse, It would be difficult to exactly determine which slave holders were associated with your family from just the indexes. Warren Andrews, a slave holder (or his descendants) who came to Washington County, Georgia from Tyrell County, NC sometime after 1774 indicates that the Andrews family held a slave by the name of Sam (Samuel?) along with slaves named Simon, Robin, Toney, Diner and Pompey. This information was gleaned from pages 256-7 of a publication by Clara W. Pierce – a manuscript titled "The Pierce's and Their Posterity" which is held by the Washington County Historical Society's Genealogy Research Center and Old Jail Museum in Sandersville, GA. The information about Samuel and Leecia's family was extracted from the 1870 US Census of Washington County, Georgia. In Index 2 you will find the surnamed Andrews who held slaves. I made a copy of the of Georgia Archives Microfilm #196-75 on a flashdrive of the Washington County, Georgia 1869 Tax Returns and transferred the information onto a CD which is at the Washington County Historical Society's Genealogy Research Center. It can also be accessed on Ancestry.com for the subscription fee (recently added after the publication of my book). Sorting out African American Genealogy is a challenge and involves many turns. Slave holding families intermarried, sold, traded and bequeathed slaves in all kinds of ways. Unraveling how those events occurred is a task..Sometimes we get wrapped up in a particular surname and that surname may be completely wrong, so don't just limit yourself to just one particular surname. As you look at the Census records, look at everyone on a particular page and just before and after that page. Good luck.

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    April 28, 2013 10:06 pmPosted 1 year ago
    LaShanda

    I am trying to research my family history as well. My great great grandfather name was Walter Dixon. His first wife name was Susie Bell. I was told that Susie Bell is a Cherokee Indian. Her parents lived on a hill in Sandersville. She had a brother named Uncle John Tarver. They disowned her after she married a black man and forced her on theri land. This is all the information I have on where they lived. Susie Bell was born in 1890 and died in 1923. Walter Dixon was born about 1873 and died 1945. I beleive our family name was Wallace before purchased by slave owners.

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      May 3, 2013 11:41 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      LaShanda, Thank you for your interest in my work. I wish you continued success in retrieving your family's history. You might want to look at this reference, if you haven't done so already: http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us:8888/cdm4/item_viewer…. This is Georgia Secretary of state image of Susie Bell Mathis Dixon's death certificate from 1923.

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    April 17, 2013 1:03 amPosted 1 year ago
    S lawrence

    Adam my great grandparents were William and Jeanie Hodges (Aldophus) which makes us cousins. Between Detroit and Philadelphia I would guess there are at least a thousand descendents of William and Jeanie. If you come across any info on Alex and Polly Lawrence or Lorrance as it was mis[elled in one of the early census records let me know. With 11 kids including my grandfather there has to be some Lawrence's left there.

    Steve Lawrence

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      April 18, 2013 8:59 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Steve, there are still some Lawrence's who live in Washington County. At least one set has considerable musical talent. I will be looking for more information.

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    March 29, 2013 1:17 amPosted 1 year ago
    Adam L. Adolphus

    Erina, T J Elder high is mentioned in the book, but it was brought into existence after the period that the book covers. The predecessor to TJ Elder High – The Sandersville Industrial School has its founders and trustees pictured in the book seated before the old school itself. The best way to get information on T J Elder High School is the visit the Elderite Association's web page: http://wacoelderite.com/Home_Page.php
    There you can find some photographs and history of the school. The Elderites have done an amazing job in preserving the legacy of TJ Elder and the school he created. The school is on the list of Historic Places and has a marker to designate it as such.

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    March 25, 2013 11:41 amPosted 1 year ago
    Erina

    Are there any pictures or information available on TJ ELder High?

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    March 24, 2013 8:36 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Semone

    Hi Mr. Adolphus,

    After reviewing you index, I found that the names of the parents of my great great great grandmother (John and Mourning Jackson) are mentioned several times, along with Margaret, Anna, and Eliza Jackson. I have recently undertaken the task of reconstructing my family history. If there is any additional information that you can provide me about these individuals I would greatly appreciate it. I am retired and plan to visit Washington, Ga for research purposes. Would it be possible to meet with you? I would love to learn how to refine my research techniques. Also, what is the quickest way to obtain your book?

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      March 29, 2013 1:10 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Semone, I don't have any familiarity with the genealogy of the Jackson family, The information in the book was intended to provide a sort of jumping off point for family research. which will never be found in any one location. It all takes time, collaboration, association, luck etc to get a better picture of your family's past. If no one writes your family's history, there will not be one. Jackson is a very common surname and I can't determine from my book which Jackson's are associated with your family. For instance one Mourning Jackson married a John Salter in 1871 and another Mourning Jackson appears to be the daughter of Alexander and Charity Jackson and is 20 years old in 1870. A John Jackson appears on the tax and voter rolls in Washington County before 1870. Another John Jackson marries Lucinda Jordan in 1867. Margaret Jackson is married to Bookey Jackson in 1870 and another Margaret Jackson is married to John Jackson in 1870. They can't be the same people because of their ages, their location and their partners during the same time period. I live in Washington County and I would be happy to meet with you. The best way to get a copy of the book is to mail a check for $55.00 (this includes shipping and handling) to the Genealogy Research Center, PO Box 6088, Sandersville, GA 31082 and provide your mailing address. The people at the Research Center can tell you how to reach me. The Center is open Tues, Thurs & Fri from 2-5 PM and on Sats 10AM – 2PM Their telephone number is 478-552-6965 and e-mail is genealogyresearch@att.net

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        April 9, 2013 11:08 pmPosted 1 year ago
        Semone

        Thanks so much for your reply. I am in the process of trying to write my family history, and you are right, it has been and is time consuming. However, it has become my passion. The excerpts that you provided relative to the Jackson name have been helpful, and I plan on making a trip to the research center so that I can refine my data . I am sure that this visit will provide me with some research techniques that I have not employed to date. I also look forward to meeting with you. Again, thanks for the reply and information.

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    February 10, 2013 9:10 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Deby

    Hi,

    In your research, have you found any information about Fannie Trawick?

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      February 14, 2013 3:11 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Deby,
      Fannie Trawick appears in the book on page 392, but her name is spelled Traywick. I have no doubt that they are the same person. Fannie was married to Sam Tra(y)wick and their children were:Morgan, Dock, Rolla, Mark, Georgia and Laura. John "Jack" Trawick is my great great grandfather and his son George is my great grandfather and George's daughter Katie is my grandmother..

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        March 9, 2013 6:02 amPosted 1 year ago
        Deby

        Hi,

        Thank you so much for your reply. I've seen so many spellings of the name. In the 1880 census it's spelled Trayic.I found Fannie listed as 'mother" on the death certificate of my great great great grandfather, Mark Reeves. At some point (based on the tax digests and other things) Mark and Rolla changed their last names to Reeves. I have found Mark living near Samuel and also working for/with him (according to the tax digest), Mark living near Georgia, etc., so I'm pretty confident it's the same family unit. The Reeves and the Traywicks are connected. i have my theories about how, but I want to confirm the connection. Anyway, thanks again for the information and I'll read the book.

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    February 10, 2013 3:15 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Adam L. Adolphus

    Susan, The numbers represent the page number whereon the names are found.

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    January 31, 2013 1:45 amPosted 1 year ago
    Susan

    I was looking through what you have published and I saw my Uncles name and my great grandmothers' name. McHenry Boatwright and America Gonder Hooks. Can you tell me anything about what the numbers beside their names mean?

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  • October 6, 2012 6:59 pmPosted 2 years ago
    @Miamiboi2Be

    how did you manage toaquire so many of those old pictures i was told there was a picture taken of my great-great grandmother who was born a slave and was half-indian but thepiture was lost when they moved to Philadelphia from baldwin county is there a possible way i could go about locating the picture possibly if the photographer saved pictures from back then ?

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      December 6, 2012 4:51 amPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus, Sr

      The pictures were acquired from descendants of those depicted. Pictures like those in the book have come from amateur to professional photographers of the era. Baldwin County, Georgia (the subject of my current work) was the center of much of the political and economic activity in Georgia prior to the Civil War. I will be beating the bushes in hopes of getting photographs from Baldwin County African American descendants. Some sources you could try are: the Vanishing Georgia Images at the Georgia Secretary of State Archives website: The Milledgeville Historic Newspapers website; and the Familysearch.org website with particular attention to Georgia County Probate Records. The latter two will not produce any images, but they will help in identifying where your ancestors may have been in Baldwin County, Geeorgia.

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  • August 10, 2012 4:02 amPosted 2 years ago
    Miles Adolph Jr

    Miles an Margreat had in. 3sons2daughters He had 1bro 1.sister John n Annie Adolphus moms name Nettie Adolphus .

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      January 3, 2013 5:09 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus, Sr

      Miles, Jr. , I would certainly like to exchange information with you. Would you contact me through the Washington County Historical Society's e-mail: genealogyresearch@att.net. The Research Center is only open on a part time basis and it may take me a few days to get bck to you. Looking forward to future exchanges.

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    August 7, 2012 3:22 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Talmadge M Smith

    I just attended a family reunion in Savannah this weekend. (Kelsey) one of my cousins had your book. I also discovered that my Grandfather was born and lived for some time in Sandersville. In your research have you come across Isaac Carlton Smith? He was born around 1876. I do know that he attended Atlanta Baptist College 1899-1903. I found that he was a Principal of The Chattahoochee Institute, Fort Gaines, Clay County(African American) or Chattahoochee  Valley High School. Cir 1913-1916

    Do you think that your book will give me greater insight who his family was?

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      January 2, 2013 6:02 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus, Sr

      The name Isaac Smith appears in the book in for several instances going back to 1803. You can visit the Index I pages which have the names of all the African Americans in the book. (Click on Index I above to see the complete Index). I can't determine if the book will meet your particular needs. I did the best I could to document items according to their availability. Since the book was published, Familysearch.org has placed on line a great number of Georgia County Probate records (including Washington County). I examined every Washington County courthouse record for information above the slave population.

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    June 14, 2012 4:06 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Cort45

    What information do you have on the Jenkins Family in Sandersville

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      March 11, 2013 11:45 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Adam L. Adolphus

      Cort45, I apologize for not responding to you sooner. Somehow, I missed your post. There are a total of 58 surnamed Jenkins in the book. Additionally, there are a total of 142 slave held by Jenkins slave holders with Uriah Jenkins being the principal holder. 5 of the enslaved had no names attached to them. You can view the names of the surnamed Jenkins African Americans by clicking on VIEW INDEX 1 above. You can find out what the source documents are by recording the page numbers of the surnamed Jenkins and Jenkins slave holders in the indexes and looking in the table of contents for the corresponding pages. I hope that this belated information is helpful to you

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    April 12, 2012 5:45 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Adam L. Adolphus

    Robert, I don't know if there is any relationship or not. During the early days of my research, I believed that there may have been a connection with a Eugenia Hodges who was found in one Alabama County. I never could find any direct connection though.

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    April 10, 2012 2:53 amPosted 2 years ago
    Robert Hodges

    Are they related to the Alabama Hodges family?

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