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Welcome to the New Lowcountry Africana Youth Corner!

Welcome to the new Lowcountry Africana Youth Corner, where we share resources and ideas for involving young ones in family history. One great way to interest children in family history is to encourage them to ask family members (especially elders) about their lives, and their memories of ancestors.

The upcoming holidays are a great time for kids to learn from elders, while the family is gathered.

And StoryCorps has created the National Day of Listening, a new national holiday devoted to oral history, to help you get started!

Each year, Story Corps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

Want to learn more about oral history? Here is a great video series on oral history made by kids, from the Minnesota Historical Society - "How to Do Oral History."

Hope you enjoy and find some inspiration here! To learn more about the National Day of Listening and how your family can participate, please click here!

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Today's Video: Getting Started on Your Oral History Project

Today we feature part 2 of a great series on oral history, produced by the Minnesota Historical Society.

"Getting Started on Your Oral History Project" will help you learn about the oral history process, determine the purpose of your project, establish who you will interview, do general research and become familiar with your equipment.

Hope you enjoy and find the video helpful!

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Transcript of Live Facebook Chat with Joseph McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project

Evening friends! We just had a wonderful live Facebook chat with Joseph McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project! Joe was chatting live from his stay at Bacon's Castle. You can view live streaming video of his stay by following this link:

Transcript of Live Chat

In case you missed any of the live chat, here is a recap. Any questions Joe was not able to answer during the chat, he will answer in a special blog post when he returns from his trip. Many thanks to everyone who joined us, it was fun!

George Geder: Dear Joseph, Have you encountered any writings, inscriptions on walls, pieces of newspaper, or anything that may have suggested that there was any reading or writing going on in the slave dwelling?

Joseph McGill: Yes, I have but limited. Remember it was illegal for them to read and write. Pat Richley-Erickson: I know the discomfort you experience sleeping in such a dwelling is nothing compared to the life experienced by the original inhabitants. Please share your thoughts as you settle in for the night.

Joseph McGill: Tonight is comforting because of all of the company I have.

True A Lewis: I'm just curious abt the whole process and look forward to learning. IS it taped? and does his mind and body go back to those times in Slavery?

Joseph McGill: The process is quite simple. Sleep in a slave cabin and leverage the attention that it brings.

Diana DuMond Glass: What is the feeling you take away with you as you leave the dwellings?

Joseph McGill: A feeling of satisfaction that I am honoring the ancestors.

Paul Garbarini: Is this the oldest dwelling you've stayed in?

Joseph McGill Yes, located at the oldest brick dwelling ii.. (lost him here!)

Fallon Green: Have you ever thought of sharing your experience by linking up with UStream? I think your idea is great and I believe there is a wider audience for what you are doing? I want not only to chat with you...but also to share with you the experience...in a place that is SAFE and FAR away from critters you so calmly mention? Have you thought at all about taping your experience for wider consumption so that others can then share in your reflection on the experience of sleeping in each slave cabin? It would be great to know the names of the people who once slept there and what they did...?

Joseph McGill Yes, I am doing more research on the people. I am trying to master the technology for capturing this project.

Bernice Bennett: Joe, what do you usually take with you for an overnight stay in a cabin?

Joseph McGill Sleeping bag, pillow and a club.

Pat Richley-Erickson: hmm, a club.

Tusculum Institute at Sweet Briar College: Is the club for guarding against animals, people, or both?

Joseph McGill: Animals

Sarah Edwards Kemp: How and when did you get started with the Project? Also, how do you identify which cabins to sleep in? Thanks!

Joseph McGill: 2010

Jacqueline DeGroat: How many people are with you tonight?

Joseph McGill: 17 people

Charlotte Hutson-Wrenn: wow!

Regina Mason: Joe, now that you have been doing this for a while, has the bureaucracy or resistance to your staying in slave cabins gotten any easier?

Nadia K. Orton asks: Have you encountered any major problems or resistance in arranging a stay?

Joseph McGill I am making progress.

True A Lewis: Are people allowed to sign up to go on these slave dwelling experiences with you?

Joseph McGill: Yes, I will release the 2013 schedule soon.

Yvette Porter Moore asks: Has there been any excavations? Are there any graves, or any other markings around the cabins that would reveal that these people lived here?

Joseph McGill: Limited excavation, it is not known where the slave graves are.

Regina Mason asks: Joe, now that you have been doing this for a while, has the bureaucracy or resistance to your staying in slave cabins gotten any easier?

Nadia K. Orton: Have you encountered any major problems or resistance in arranging a stay?

Joseph McGill I am making progress. I had a good week last week. college of charleston, nps

Charlotte Hutson-Wrenn: Wishing you the best this evening, Joe! Wish I could be there to draw the night. What colors would you say you feel in the night during these experiences - any? white? black? red? blue?

Joseph McGill: Mosaic

Charlotte Hutson-Wrenn ha! like in rainbow, I bet:)

Dianne Watson Armstrong: so wish I were there tonight. Sending you love and support from Helena, Montana. I am awed by this project and dream of being a part. I know the ancestors are smiling on you.[/dcs_p]

Joseph McGill: I will release the 2013 schedule soon.

Tina Sansone: Is he keeping a diary or any writings of this? any documentary being done, sorry if this has been asked, I came in late.

Joseph McGill No documentary

Tina Sansone: There is an area here in Memphis where slave cabins use to be. Does he feel using the metal detector in these areas will bring up anything today's time period?

Joseph McGill Metal detecting should be done by professionals.

Many thanks to everyone who joined us for the chat, and watch this space for Joe's answers to questions he did not get to answer in the chat!

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Freedmen's Labor Contract, E.M. Clark, James Island, Charleston, SC

Freedmen's Labor Contracts

Charleston County, SC, Contracts

Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina,

Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865-1868

NARA Record Group 105

M1910, Reel 63, Target 12

TITLE OF CONTRACT:

E.M. Clark with Freed people

DATE OF CONTRACT:

April 4, 1866

PLACES MENTIONED IN CONTRACT:

Charleston County

South Carolina

James Island

NAMES OF FREEDPERSONS
  • Samuel Townsend
  • Susan Roane
  • Jimmy Glaze
  • John Mikell
  • Dinah Mikell
  • Frank Haywood
  • Gabriel Rogers
  • Phebe Rogers
  • Hector Rogers
  • Mosses Young
  • Harriet Singleton
  • Rebecca Haywood
  • Billy Mack
  • Jacob Ladson
  • Charles Mitchell
  • Wm Gedders
  • Kit McKnight
  • Aaron Simons
  • Betty Simms
  • Thomas Chapagne
  • Nannie St. Clair
  • York Men
  • 6

    The Slave Dwelling Project: The One That Got Away

    Laurelwood Slave Cabin, Soon to be Restored

    In my attempt to bring much needed attention to the necessity to restore and interpret extant former slave dwellings throughout the United States, over the past 2 ½ years I have spent the night in 36 such places in 11 states. Known as the Slave Dwelling Project, past stays have included cabins on plantations to dependency buildings in urban settings or attic space in the main house, these dwellings are built of wood, brick, stone or whatever was available in the area at the time of construction.

    Plantations that housed the enslaved that toiled in fields of rice, tobacco, cotton, sugarcane and hemp have all been stops along the way for the Slave Dwelling Project. Urban dependencies that housed the enslaved that serviced the mansions or the businesses that existed within antebellum cities have also been stops for the Project. Fellow Civil War reenactors, school teachers, tour guides, writers and descendants of slaves and slave owners are only a few of the categories of approximately fifty people that have shared the experience with me.

    Through this journey there was only one stay that eluded me, the offer that I had to refuse. Stay Number 16, Laurelwood Plantation was placed on the list as a result of collaborating with the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation. Included in the mission of the Palmetto Trust is the preservation of historic buildings located throughout the State of South Carolina.

    One method that the Trust uses for preservation is acquiring historic properties through a revolving fund, placing easements on them and selling the property to a preservation friendly buyer. Laurelwood Plantation was such a property. I had all confidence that the stay would occur swimmingly because my seventh stay at Morris Street in Anderson, SC was also arranged by the Palmetto Trust.

    This stay was scheduled for Friday, April 15, 2011 to coincide with the day the Trust would celebrate the sale of the site to its new owners Jackie and Jeremy Thomas. When I arrived that day a group of supporters had already gathered there to celebrate with the new owners. On many occasions up until that point, I always made it my business to get to each site no-later-than 5:00 pm because it was necessary that I check each place thoroughly before dark. Unfortunately, sleeping in the slave cabin on the site on that night was not meant to be due to its dilapidated state. Had I known this prior to showing up on the property, it would not have been placed on the calendar for the Slave Dwelling Project. All was not lost because I did the next best thing by sleeping on the porch of the mansion which also needed to be restored.

    Priority for preservation for the new owners was of course the mansion but they assured me that restoring the cabin was on their short list of things to do. I praised their intent and enthusiasm knowing that similar promises from other owners had been made but to that date restoration of those places was still pending. Additionally, the new owners were also in the process of relocating from England to Eastover, SC.

    Well, I kept in touch with Jeremy. I even went back for a visit to the site when he returned from England to check on the progress of the work that was being done to the mansion. Jeremy had to deal with some very serious contractual matters but despite that, he again assured me that he would restore the cabin and grant me access for educational purposes.

    The Good News

    The Richland County Conservation Commission has granted the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation a $25,000 grant to restore the cabin. The grantee agrees to provide a 20% match of cash or in-kind services of at least $5,000 for a minimum project cost of $30,000. More specifically the grant will be used to rebuild the rock chimney and fireplace; replace the rock foundation and piers; repair the floor system and exterior siding and replace the roof.

    The restoration is currently underway and upon completion, I will conduct that stay in the cabin that eluded me. That stay is scheduled for Saturday, November 3, 2012. More importantly, I will work with the owner and the Palmetto Trust to develop programs to interpret the dwelling.

    Thanks to the Richland County Conservation Commission, the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation and the willing property owners, Jackie and Jeremy Thomas, the slave cabin at Laurelwood Plantation has become the best example of why the Slave Dwelling Project has to continue.

    Related Links

    http://www.aboutourfreedom.com/2011/05/slave-dwellings-owners-saving-landmarks.html

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    Join Friends of McLeod for a Free Lecture by Joseph McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project

    Joe McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project

    Joe McGill, Creator of the Slave Dwelling Project

    What: Free Lectue by Joseph McGill, Creator of the Slave Dwelling Project

    When: Tuesday, September 18

    Where: 217 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, SC

    Admission: Free

    ---August 26, 2012 The Friends of McLeod, Inc. invite the public to attend a free presentation by Joseph McGill who will speak on his Slave Dwelling Project on Tuesday, September 18 at 7:00 pm at the DNR auditorium at Fort Johnson, 217 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, SC.

    McGill is with the National Trust for Historic Preservation and is a reenactor with the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. To quote one source, “His message is strikingly simple. He spends the night in various slave dwellings (cabins or quarters within homes) as they currently exist throughout the United States to convey a direct message - This Place Matters.”

    McGill has spent the night in 36 extant slave dwellings in 11 states. On June 19, 2010 (Juneteenth), he spent the night at McLeod Plantation and was accompanied by two fellow Civil War reenactors, one of whom is a descendent of an enslaved family at McLeod.

    “McLeod is a perfect example of restoring buildings that have the potential to tell a segment of the complete story of Americaʼs past,” says McGill. “More specifically, the slave cabins are a rare part of the African American-built environment that has often been only a footnote in American history,” adds McGill.

    McGillʼs presentation is suitable for students, families and friends. When McLeod Plantation is opened to the public, possibly next year, this lecture is one of a series of informative topics that the Friends of McLeod are preparing so all will have some knowledge about the beauty and the history of what they will see at this last remaining plantation on James Island.

    A reception will be held after the lecture so everyone can meet Mr. McGill.

    This program is co-sponsored with a grant from The SC Humanities Council.

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    Freedmen's Labor Contract, Frederick Fraser with Freedmen, Colleton County, SC, 1865

    Freedmen's Labor Contract

    Colleton District, June 1865-Feb. 1868

    Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina,

    Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865-1872

    NARA M1910, Roll 103, Target 5

    TITLE OF CONTRACT:

    Frederick Fraser with Freed people

    DATE OF CONTRACT:

    No date, 1865

    PLACES MENTIONED IN CONTRACT:

    Colleton District

    South Carolina

    St. George's Parish

    NAMES OF FREEDPERSONS:
  • Daniel Smith
  • Priam Edwards
  • Frank Washington
  • Chloe Washington
  • 0

    Freedmen's Labor Contract, Dr. Joseph Murray with Freedmen, Goose Creek, SC, 1865

    Freedmen's Labor Contracts

    Charleston County, SC, Contracts

    Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina,

    Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865-1868

    NARA Record Group 105

    M1910, Reel 63, Target 12

    TITLE OF CONTRACT:

    Dr. Joseph Murray with freed people

    DATE OF CONTRACT:

    July 4, 1865

    PLACES MENTIONED IN CONTRACT:

    Charleston County

    South Carolina

    Goose Creek

    NAMES OF FREEDPERSONS
  • Plenty Murray (colored atty)
  • Nancy Murray
  • Hamp Murray
  • Allen Prince
  • Joseph Murray
  • Keasiah Jo
  • Morgan Murray
  • Harriet Murray
  • Moses Murray
  • Harry Murray
  • Adeline Murray
  • Libby Murray
  • Nelly Murray
  • Sampson Murray
  • Louis Rhett
  • MaryAnn Rhett
  • Amelia Rhett
  • Jane Rhett
  • Louisa Murray
  • Barbery Richard
  • Henry Murray
  • 0

    African American Civil War Lecture Series

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    August 23, 2012

    For additional information contact:

    Joseph McGill 843-408-7727

    jmcgill@savingplaces.org

    African American Civil War Lecture Series

    The fourth installment of the SC African American Heritage Commission's (SCAAHC) African American Civil War Lecture Series will be Thursday, September 20 at the Greenville Cultural Exchange Center, 700 Arlington Ave., Greenville, SC, at 6:30 - 8 pm.

    Since February, SCAAHC has presented lectures that explore the way African Americans lived during the Civil War and the roles they played in the war. The lecture series was made possible by a grant from The Humanities Council SC.

    The lectures will continue the Commission’s commitment to commemorating the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War in a way that promotes historical and cultural understanding. The presenters and their subjects will include:

  • SCAAHC member Dr. Abel Bartley, Professor and the Director of Pan-African Studies at Clemson University speaking on The Causes of the War
  • Dr. Eric Emerson, Director of the SC Department of Archives and History speaking on the Ordinance of Secession
  • SCAAHC member Dr. Larry Watson, Associate Professor and Coordinator of History at SC State University speaking on Black Confederates
  • All lectures supported by the Humanities Council grant are free and open to the public.

    "The South Carolina African American Heritage Commission is grateful to the Humanities Council SC and the participating scholars for their support of the commission's mission to illuminate all aspects of South Carolina African American history for all South Carolinians," said SCAAHC chairman Bhakti Larry Hough of Hemingway. "The story of African Americans during the Civil War and the war's impact on them during and since the war is certainly one that is worthy of illumination."

    Additional sponsors have ensured that the grant challenge is met and that additional lectures can be added. They are the South Carolina African American Historical Alliance; Fort Sumter / Fort Moultrie Trust; and the South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

    The mission of the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission is to identify and promote the preservation of historic sites, structures, buildings, and culture of the African American experience in South Carolina and to assist and enhance the efforts of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. The 15-member commission includes representatives from all regions of the state.

    For additional information, contact the project coordinator SCAAHC member Joseph McGill at 843-408-7727.

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    Index of Crop Liens, James Island, Charleston County, SC, 1885 to 1894

    Immediately following the Civil War, group labor contracts were the means by which the transition from slave to paid agricultural labor was made. After the Freedmen's Bureau withdrew from the southern states, contract labor gave way to tenant farming and the crop lien system.

    Under the crop lien system, merchants extended credit to individual farmers who borrowed against the anticipated value of future crops. When the harvest was made, farmers repaid the merchant from the proceeds [1].

    Sometimes the crop proceeds were sufficient to repay the lender. If they were not, the farmer would begin the new growing season working to repay ever-increasing debts in a cycle historians have termed debt peonage. The crop lien system, though often harmful to the autonomy of individual farmers, was the means by which southern agriculture was rebuilt in the years following the Civil War [2].

    From 1885 to 1894, cotton merchant Joseph T. Dill extended credit to farmers on James Island and in rural Charleston County. Below is an index of the liens. The original documents can be accessed on microfilm at the Register of Mesne Conveyance, Charleston County Courthouse, O.T. Wallace County Office Building, 101 Meeting Street, Room 200, Charleston, SC.

    Date of Document Date of Deed Grantee Grantor Book Page Location
    2/13/1886 2/10/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball George Brown K20 82 James Island
    2/13/1886 2/10/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Somerset Rivers K20 84 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Robt Grant K20 83 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball George Scott K20 84 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Nelly Scott K20 85 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Stephen Gaillard K20 83 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Caroline Wallace K20 86 Charleston County
    2/13/1886 2/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jacob Weston K20 86 Charleston County
    2/19/1886 2/13/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jno McKelvy D20 535 James Island
    2/19/1886 2/16/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Isaac Walker A20 324 James Island
    2/19/1886 2/17/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Guy Walker D20 535 James Island
    2/19/1886 2/18/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Christmas Bennett A20 322 James Island
    2/19/1886 2/18/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Richard Singleton A20 323 James Island
    2/27/1886 2/19/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Abram Fludd A20 329 James Island
    2/27/1886 2/23/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball April Simmons A20 328 James Island
    2/27/1886 2/23/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cesar Jackson A20 327 James Island
    2/27/1886 2/25/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Ned Drayton A20 326 James Island
    2/27/1886 2/25/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm Deas A20 325 James Island
    3/5/1886 2/27/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Richard Bachman A20 335 James Island
    3/5/1886 2/2/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball C Hamilton A20 332 James Island
    3/5/1886 3/2/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sam Richardson A20 331 James Island
    3/5/1886 3/2/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm Moultrie A20 330 James Island
    3/5/1886 3/2/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball T Cromwell A20 334 James Island
    3/5/1886 3/2/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Henry Drayton A20 333 James Island
    3/12/1886 3/3/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Toby R. Richardson A20 347 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/5/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Bolles A20 336 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/5/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Harriet Coaxum A20 337 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/6/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sam Simmons A20 547 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/6/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Mary Ladson A20 343 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/8/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball March DeLeslin A20 338 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/8/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Danl Smith A20 345 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Bob Richardson A20 344 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cooper Judge A20 342 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Mary Fraser A20 339 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm. Fraser A20 340 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cesar Grant A20 341 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jerry Brown D20 546 James Island
    3/10/1886 3/9/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Lizzie Fell D20 546 James Island
    3/13/1886 3/10/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jos Bonnum A20 346 James Island
    3/13/1886 3/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jno Lafayette A20 349 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/12/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Adam Jenkins A20 348 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/15/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Thos Young A20 356 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/15/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jack Fraser A20 353 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/16/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Primus Middleton A20 354 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/16/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball R.H. Forrester A20 352 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/16/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Isaac Ferguson A20 351 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/16/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Primus Bachman A20 350 James Island
    3/20/1886 3/17/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Morris Watson A20 355 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/20/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Brutus Pinckney A20 358 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/23/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball David Fell A20 357 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/24/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball W.W. McLeod D20 556 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/24/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball W. White A20 359 James Island
    4/13/1886 3/26/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Abram Brown A20 365 James Island
    4/13/1886 4/1/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Dick Pinckney A20 364 James Island
    4/13/1886 4/3/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball D & H Whaley A20 362 James Island
    4/13/1886 4/3/1886 Dill, J.T. & Ball Stephney Brisbane A20 363 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/14/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Scipio Singleton A20 401 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/22/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sammy Washington A20 402 James Island
    3/26/1886 3/22/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Celia White C19 383 James Island
    4/28/1886 3/30/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball C. Bennett Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1886 4/2/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Lizzie Fell Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1886 4/5/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Susan Gadsden Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1886 4/7/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Rivers A20 406 Charleston County
    4/15/1886 4/7/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball C. Wallace Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1886 4/9/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Julia Brown A20 405 Charleston County
    4/15/1887 4/12/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jacob Weston A20 407 Charleston County
    4/15/1887 4/12/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Morris Scott Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1887 4/13/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Mary Ladson Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1887 4/13/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Amos Moultrie Indexed Charleston County
    4/15/1887 4/13/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Peter Scott Indexed Charleston County
    4/28/1887 4/14/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm. Moultrie Indexed Charleston County
    4/28/1887 4/15/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Kitt McKnight A20 412 Charleston County
    4/28/1887 4/15/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball R. Bachman A20 409 Charleston County
    4/28/1887 4/20/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball A. Fludd A20 411 Charleston County
    4/28/1887 4/23/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball D. Fell A20 410 Charleston County
    7/12/1887 6/17/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Isaac Walker K20 596 Charleston County
    7/6/1887 6/18/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Brisbane A20 415 Charleston County
    7/6/1887 6/24/1887 Dill, J.T. & Ball Thos Smith A20 414 Charleston County
    1/13/1888 1/5/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball C.C. Bennett D20 782 Charleston County
    2/18/1888 2/11/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball M. Watson X20 4 Charleston County
    2/18/1888 2/11/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball R. Singleton L20 169 Charleston County
    3/7/1888 2/18/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Thos Young L20 224 Charleston County
    3/7/1888 2/20/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball K. McKnight L20 221 Charleston County
    2/28/1888 2/25/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball T.R. Richardson A20 420 Charleston County
    3/7/1888 3/2/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Geo Brown A20 421 Charleston County
    3/7/1888 3/2/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cooper Judge A20 422 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/8/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball W. Seymour X20 18 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/9/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball C. Jackson A20 429 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/9/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball F. Baynard A20 425 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Bennett A20 426 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball J. Ferguson A20 427 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball R.H. Forrester A20 428 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball P. Bachman A20 423 Charleston County
    3/13/1888 3/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball R. Bachman A20 424 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/13/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball D. Fell A20 432 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/14/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball A. Fludd A20 433 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/15/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Simmons A20 434 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/16/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball D. Whaley O19 430 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/16/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball A. Moultrie O19 431 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/16/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Ned Drayton A20 430 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/16/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball J. Bolles A20 440 Charleston County
    3/21/1888 3/20/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Rivers A20 437 Charleston County
    4/13/1888 3/24/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball J. Lafayette A20 439 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 3/24/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball W. Moultrie A20 438 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 3/24/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Washington A20 439 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 3/27/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball E. Seymour Indexed Charleston County
    5/2/1888 3/28/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball M. Scott Indexed Charleston County
    5/2/1888 3/31/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball J. Brown Indexed Charleston County
    5/2/1888 4/10/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball N. Scott Indexed Charleston County
    5/2/1888 4/18/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Ravenel A20 444 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 4/20/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball G. Rivers A20 445 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 4/21/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball Mary Ladson A20 443 Charleston County
    5/2/1888 4/28/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball T. Cromwell A20 442 Charleston County
    6/21/1888 5/19/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Brisbane A20 448 Charleston County
    6/21/1888 5/25/1888 Dill, J.T. & Ball M. DeLeslin A20 449 Charleston County
    2/14/1889 2/13/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Caroline Giles A20 452 James Island
    2/14/1889 2/14/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sandy Brown Sr. A20 451 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/16/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Roberson A20 460 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/16/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sam Simmons A20 461 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/16/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Richard Singleton A20 462 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/19/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball C.C. Bennett A20 453 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/19/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Abram Fludd A20 455 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/19/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cesar Jackson A20 456 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/19/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Amos Moultrie A20 457 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/20/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball T.R. Richardson A20 458 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/20/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball S. Rivers A20 459 James Island
    2/25/1889 2/20/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Ned Drayton A20 454 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball R.H. Forrester A20 468 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm. Fraser A20 469 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball B. Pinckney A20 473 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Ravenel A20 474 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Rob Roberson Sr. A20 475 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Richard Bachman A20 463 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Bolles A20 464 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Cesar Grant A20 470 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball C. Judge A20 471 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Charles Drayton A20 467 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jas Bonnum A20 465 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/28/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball T. Cromwell A20 466 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/28/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Thos Young A20 476 James Island
    3/1/1889 2/28/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball J. Lafayette A20 472 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/1/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Renty Bradley A20 477 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/1/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Scipio Singleton A20 480 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/1/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball March DeLeslin A20 479 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/2/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Sammy Washington A20 482 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/2/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Morris Watson A20 483 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/2/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm. Deas A20 478 James Island
    3/6/1889 3/4/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Thos Smith A20 481 James Island
    3/9/1889 3/5/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Wm. Moultrie A20 486 James Island
    3/22/1889 3/12/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Maria C. Gaillard A20 489 James Island
    3/22/189 3/16/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Henry Whaley A20 490 James Island
    3/26/1889 3/19/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Isaac Ferguson A20 493 James Island
    3/26/1889 3/21/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Jim Fell A20 492 James Island
    3/26/1889 3/22/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Nellie Scott A20 494 James Island
    3/26/1889 3/23/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Stephney Brisbane A20 491 James Island
    4/13/1889 4/12/1889 Dill, J.T. & Ball Geo Brown L20 497 Charleston County
    2/14/1890 2/13/1890 Dill, J.T. & Ball Geo Brown A20 507 James Island
    6/20/1894 6/15/1894 Dill, J.T. & Ball J.H. Wigger D21 260 James Island
    4/21/1894 4/12/1894 Dill, J.T. & Ball R.W. Brown, Exr. L21 745 Charleston County

    References Cited

    [1] Royce, Edward 1993 The Origins of Southern Share Cropping. Temple University Press, pp. 187-188.

    [2] Danbom, David B. 2006 Born in the Country: A History of Rural America. JHU Press, unpaged.