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Genealogist Nicka Smith Shares Reasons to Listen or Be Listened To!

A Special Guest Post by Nicka Smith
Two Generations

Today, Friday, November 28 is StoryCorps' 7th annual National Day of Listening! Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

In honor of the National Day of Listening, genealogist and photographer Nicka Smith shares 5 reasons why you should interview a loved one or be interviewed yourself!

Technology Will Always Change, But the Crux Your Story Won't

We change technology like we do our socks. This has caused our world's life cycle to speed up as well. While all the change around us continues, the central themes of our life's stories won't and are being preserved during the National Day of Listening.

The World Wants to Hear From You

Social media has made having a voice online something that is common place. On the other hand, few outlets (outside of podcasting) have chosen to utilize and document with just the power of the recorded voice. Try talking instead of just using your fingertips to share your perspective with the world.

Your Descendants Are Hungry For Your Perspective

Think of your recording as an audio time capsule. You're descendants will be eager to know about the world as it was when you lived and what you thought about it. This is something few of us have from our ancestors.

Develop Your Interviewer's Skills

Time and effort is essential when deciding to interview someone, especially if it's recorded. Provide a unique opportunity for your interviewer by giving them the ability to hone their skills on you.

It's Fun!

There are few times outside of applying for a job that a person will ever be interviewed. Consider yourself the celebrity of the day during the National Day of Listening by documenting your life.

About Nicka Smith

Nicka Smith is a professional photographer, speaker, and documentarian with more than 14 years of experience as a genealogist. She has extensive experience in African ancestored genealogy, reverse genealogy, and family reunion planning and execution. She is also an expert in genealogical research in the Northeastern Louisiana area, sharing genealogy with youth, documenting the ancestral journey, and employing the use of new technology in genealogy and family history research.

Nicka has diverse and varied experience in communications, with a background in publications, editing, graphic design, radio, and video production. She has edited and designed several volumes of family history that include narratives, photos, and genealogical information and has also transferred these things to an online environment.

Nicka is a board member of the California Genealogical Society (CGS), a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), former chair of the Outreach and Education Committee for the African American Genealogical Society of Northern California (AAGSNC), and former project manager for the Alameda County, CA Youth Ancestral Project where more than 325 youth have been taught the value of family history. Nicka is also the family historian and lead researcher for the Atlas family of Lake Providence, East Carroll, Louisiana.

To learn more about Nicka Smith and her work, please visit her website Who Is Nicka Smith?

About StoryCorps' National Day of Listening

Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

Once your recording is complete, you can post it to StoryCorps' interactive Wall of Listening. Then share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. Please be sure to post to our Lowcountry Wall of Listening on Facebook to tell us who you interviewed!

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Five Reasons to Listen

A Special Guest Post by Angela Walton-Raji
Two Generations

How many times do we recall Thanksgiving events from years gone by? We can remember our elders who were at the dinner, and in many cases they prepared the meal that we all enjoyed. Then time passed and they were gone. We miss them, we wish they were still with us, and we wish we had asked the questions we never got to ask. And there are so many questions that could be preserved or stories to pass on, and things to be thankful for today, if only we had asked the right questions then.

So as the National Day of Listening is upon us—the day after Thanksgiving, perhaps we, who will be the elders to future generations, can pay it forward and share stories, traditions, thoughts , beliefs and history with the next generation right now. Here are five reasons to celebrate and participate in, the National Day of Listening. So let’s speak to the elders in the home and hear them.

Share the Stories Before They Are Forgotten

1) Participation in the National Day of Listening allows you and a loved one to share the stories before they are forgotten. Remember the time that grandma’s cake won the prize at the fair? Or there is the story of how one of the relatives followed his calling to become an artist and not the engineer everyone thought he should be. And how many can really tell the story of the gr. uncles who were taken prisoner in the Civil War, and who escaped from N. B Forrest? These stories capture the imagination of the children, instill self-esteem in the young, and continue an important legacy for future generations.

Learn the Meaning of Family Traditions

2) Participation provides opportunity to explain the meaning of the traditions that we celebrate. On some holidays there is a tradition of always having a certain kind of dish to the holiday meal. Beyond the expected dish a certain dish is always included which could be Pawpaw’s favorite ambrosia, Grandma’s dressing, or Daddy’s sweet potato pie. Beyond just the mere enjoyment of the food, explaining why the family always includes something as a tradition establishes a sense of continuing a legacy. Ask your subject about those traditions and how they came to be.

Share Wisdom With Future Generations

3) Participation presents a platform upon which ideas and thoughts can be shared. It is not uncommon to ask oneself what a departed loved one would think if they were there today. Participation in the National Day of listening provides the platform where you can share what they think. Your descendants will have a chance to know and not left to wonder what their ancestors thought. And participation allows the interviewee to share thoughts and emotions for the next generation to hear, and to learn from.

Share Personal Beliefs With the Next Generation

4) Participation in the National Day of Listening allows the speaker to share their personal beliefs with the next generation. Many people wonder what the ancestors believe in, from their religious faith, to their thoughts of what the future may hold. Participation in the National Day of Listening answers that question. Find out your subject’s primary motivation and share his/her insights, and beliefs for the listeners. By getting answers to these questions now, you have given the next generation the gift of an answer before the question is even asked.

Preserve History for Future Generations

5) Participation presents the opportunity to preserve history for future generations. Many will have questions about what the past was like. Their past will be a part of the next generation’s ancestral past. And some of those questions that they will answer now, will be answered by you in the future. Your participation in the National Day of Listening will keep the stories told today a part of the future. So speak to someone, listen to their story, and preserve the story they tell.

About Angela Walton-Raji

A founding member of AfriGeneas.com, Angela Walton-Raji is a genealogist, educator, lecturer and author specializing in information for beginners, via daily and weekly online genealogy chats on AfriGeneas. As host of the weekly African Roots Podcast, a number of instructional videos and as an expert consultant on video documentaries, Ms. Walton-Raji combines her skills as a genealogist with a warm on camera personality that brings comfort to her viewers through her instructional videos on YouTube, while providing them with useful information. She is a published author, host of blogs My Ancestor's Name, African-Native American Genealogy and The USCT Chronicle.

About StoryCorps' National Day of Listening

Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

Once your recording is complete, you can post it to StoryCorps' interactive Wall of Listening. Then share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. Please be sure to post to our Lowcountry Wall of Listening on Facebook to tell us who you interviewed!

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5 People Give 5 Reasons to Celebrate the National Day of Listening, Day 2: Joseph McGill

Portrait Of Happy Senior Couple At Home

Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a family member, friend or loved one about their life. This Friday, November 28, is the 7th annual National Day of Listening.

Lowcountry Africana is a proud national sponsor of StoryCorps' National Day of Listening. This year, we asked 5 colleagues to share 5 reasons to celebrate this new national holiday.

     

Yesterday, Thomas MacEntee of Geneabloggers weighed in with his post "Family Stories: Eat Them Up This Thanksgiving and All Year Round."

Today, Joseph McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project shares his 5 reasons to celebrate the National Day of Listening by gathering those family stories!

5 Reasons to Celebrate the National Day of Listening

A Special Guest Post By Joseph McGill

1. As African Americans, it is essential that we celebrate and implement National Day of Listening because a system that enslaved our ancestors and denied them an education made us more reliant on oral history. Some of that historic oral tradition that has been passed down through generations still lives with some of our elders.

2. We are not far removed from the days of segregation. Elders, especially those who are well travelled have stories of challenges they faced in a segregated country that proclaimed liberty and justice for all.

3. I would wager that every African American family was affected by the great migration of African Americans from the south to the north. Engaging those in their reasoning for leaving the south is rich information. What if any segregation they faced in the north is also a good conversation to have with them?

4. How many of our African American elders thought that they would live to see and African American President of the United States? That question alone would generate some interesting responses.

5. Lastly, a lot of our history ends up in graveyards. As an historian, I hear often; “I wish I would have interviewed her/him before he/she died.” Don’t be a victim of procrastination. Make it so!

About Joseph McGill

Joseph McGill, founder of the Slave Dwelling Project, spends the night in former slave dwellings across the country, to raise awareness of the need to preserve the places where African American ancestors lived while enslaved. You can learn more about the Slave Dwelling Project by visiting their website and Facebook page.

About StoryCorps' National Day of Listening

Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

Once your recording is complete, you can post it to StoryCorps' interactive Wall of Listening. Then share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. Please be sure to post to our Lowcountry Wall of Listening on Facebook to tell us who you interviewed!

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Family Stories: Eat Them Up This Thanksgiving and All Year Round

A Special Guest Post by Thomas MacEntee
In honor of StoryCorps’ National Day of Listening on Friday, November 28, here’s some advice from Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers on the treasure that is a family story.

Stop and Listen to the Stories Being Told

Multi Generation Family Celebrating Thanksgiving

Cleaning, cooking, getting beds ready for overnight guests. Shopping, making calls, checking weather forecasts. Worrying if there will be enough food or concern about not having enough chairs. It’s easy to get wrapped up in the busy work of any holiday including Thanksgiving. And when all is said and done, we forget to sit back and enjoy not just the company of others, but their stories. This holiday weekend, set aside time for storytelling and story listening as family and friends gather together.

 

Listen with All the Senses

While I love to write, I never set out to be a “writer” when it came to forging a career. Well, not a writer in the sense of telling and conveying family history through stories. In my chosen field, technology, I excelled at technical writing which is dry, boring and somewhat formulaic. As I caught the genealogy bug, I realized I needed to call upon a different set of skills in order to effectively capture family stories. So as I sat and listened to relatives and recorded their telling of stories, I took notes related to what I call “the sensory factors.”

On my notepad I’d have words like “smelled like rotten eggs” or “the sound made me jump,” scribbled here and there. Or as the person was speaking, I’d jot down follow-up questions such as “What color was the sky during that wildfire?” or “What did you taste?” etc. Highlighting what a person saw, smelled, heard and more can greatly help bring a story to life.

Understand that Stories Unfold and Evolve

Have you ever heard two or more versions of a family story? Even from relatives who witnessed an event? Often, our experiences are influenced by our own perceptions, beliefs and past experiences, tempered by what elements we remember of the event.

Record all versions of that story. Ask questions for clarification. There’s nothing wrong with Aunt Margaret telling the story of killing her first turkey and following it up with her husband’s story of “what really happened” as he remembered it. And be open to the fact that down the road you may discover facts that support or refute the story that Tom Turkey ran around the yard for a full hour with his head cut off!

Gather Ye Stories While Ye May

This last bit of advice is the most important: collect those family stories now. There will never be a better time than the present. Don’t wait for “the right moment” or to purchase some new fancy piece of technology to record an interview.

Use whatever it takes and realize that an opportunity deferred can often turn into an opportunity lost. How many of us regret not having an older relative relate a family story only to find that person not sitting at the Thanksgiving table the following year?

As family historians, we, of all people, know the treasures held within a family story. This holiday weekend, set a place at the table for storytelling. You’ll be surprised at what might be served up and you’ll feast on the leftovers for years to come.

© 2014, copyright Thomas MacEntee

About Thomas Macentee

Thomas MacEntee is a genealogy professional specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and as a means of interacting with others in the family history community. He is the author of Preserving Your Family's Oral History and Stories available at Amazon.

About StoryCorps' National Day of Listening

Each year, StoryCorps asks all Americans to set aside an hour on the day after Thanksgiving to interview a friend, loved one or community member about their lives, and to record the interview using recording equipment that is readily available in most homes, such as computers, smartphones, tape recorders or pen and paper, along with StoryCorps’ free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide.

Once your recording is complete, you can post it to StoryCorps' interactive Wall of Listening. Then share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. Please be sure to post to our Lowcountry Wall of Listening on Facebook to tell us who you interviewed!

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“Love Is Progress, Hate is Expensive:” The Esau Jenkins Bus Send-off to the Smithsonian Museum

   

Esau Jenkins Bus

CONTACT Paul Saylors

Preservation Society of Charleston

(843) 722-4630 psaylors@preservationsociety.org

Corie Hipp

(843) 327-2213 corie@coriehipp.com

EVENT “Love is Progress, Hate is Expensive” The Esau Jenkins Bus Send-off Sunday, June 1, 2014 from 4 PM until 6 PM, FREE to the public Corner of Calhoun and Concord Streets, across from the SC Aquarium

CHARLESTON, SC - On Sunday, June 1, 2014 at 4:00 PM on the corner of Calhoun and Concord Streets, at the proposed site for the International African American Museum and in conjunction with Piccolo Spoleto, the family of late civil rights activist Esau Jenkins and the Thomas Mayhem Pinckney Alliance of the Preservation Society of Charleston will host an event to celebrate the departure of a portion of his iconic VW bus to its new home in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Sponsored by Fielding Home for Funerals, the Jenkins Family and the Preservation Society of Charleston, the event will feature the Mt. Zion Spiritual Singers; reflections on Jenkins and the civil rights movement in Charleston; photographs and articles pertaining to Jenkins’ life and work; and light refreshments.

Esau Jenkins (1910–1972) was a civil rights activist who was born on Johns Island, SC in 1910 and lived most of his life there. With very little formal education, he became a businessman and civil rights leader. Jenkins founded the Progressive Club in 1948, which encouraged local African Americans to register to vote, through the aid of Citizenship Schools, a topic he was educated in by his attendance at Highlander Folk Center in Tennessee. In 1959, he organized the Citizens’ Committee of Charleston County dedicated to the economic, cultural and political improvement of local African Americans. With a personal motto of “Love is Progress, Hate is Expensive” (seen on the back of his bus) Jenkins prospered his community, helping to found the Community Organization Federal Credit Union and serving on many local boards and committees. The father of a large family, he died in 1972, and after his death many institutions, programs and a bridge were named for him.

The Thomas Mayhem Pinckney Alliance is committed to supporting the Preservation Society of Charleston in identifying and preserving historic African American “built environments” in the Lowcountry. This includes those sites built by, occupied by and utilized for activities significant to the African American experience. Thomas Mayhem Pinckney Alliance Chair and Preservation Society Board Member, Julia-Ellen Craft Davis says “the bus on exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture is important because it represents national recognition of the work of Esau Jenkins who is a role model for working selflessly with others to meet a need in a community.” The alliance includes Dr. Millicent E. Brown, Alphonso Brown, Julia-Ellen Craft Davis, Corie Hipp, Ray Huff, Minerva King, Ramona LaRoche, Dr. Ade Ofunniyun, Leila Potts-Campbell, and Paul Saylors.

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Just for Fun ~ We've Added New Photos to Our Instagram Page

We enjoy sharing our photos of the beautiful Lowcountry scenery on Instagram. We've just added a new batch of photos taken at the gorgeous Botany Bay Nature Preserve on Edisto Island. Below are a few samples, many more await you on Instagram:

Come see more on our Instagram page!
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SC Freedmen's Bureau Records: USCT Bounty Claims

USCT Bounty Claims and the Information They Contain

Above: Announcement of Additional Military Bounties, Charleston Daily News, 12 Nov 1866

Announcement of Additional Military Bounties, Charleston Daily News, 12 Nov 1866 1

Bounties were monetary or material incentives paid for enlisting in the military, or rewards for service in the military. Soldiers, veterans or their survivors may have collected bounties for service in the United States Colored Troops (USCT) or the United States Navy in the Civil War. During its operation from 1865-1872, the Freedmen's Bureau acted as the agent for the payment of bounties to USCT veterans in South Carolina. 2

In order to collect a bounty, soldiers, veterans or their heirs filed an application known as a bounty claim. Among the records in the new FamilySearch collection South Carolina Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872 are several types of documents related to the payment of bounties. Registers of bounty claims filed, the bounty claims themselves and registers of bounties paid may hold valuable information concerning your ancestor's residence prior to 1870 and their service in the military.

Did Your Civil War-Era Ancestor Serve in the Military?

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System hosted by the National Park Service is a free searchable database of the names of those who served in Union or Confederate forces during the Civil War. Here you can search to see if your ancestor served in the United States Colored Troops (USCT) or the US Navy during the war. Search forms for soldiers and sailors are separate, so be sure to search both for your ancestor's name.

Soldiers and Sailors Search Form


Soldiers and Sailors Search for Sailors

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System website also offers information on the histories of Union and Confederate regiments and links to related information about significant battles, prisoner of war records and cemetery records. 3

If your ancestor served in the USCT or US Navy during the Civil War, there may be bounty claim records in the new FamilySearch collection that will further your research.

Bounty Claims and Related Documents

To view bounty claims and related documents within the new FamilySearch collection South Carolina Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872, browse to "Claim Division" records.

Claim Division Tutorial

The bulk of records concerning bounty claims appear there, however correspondence concerning bounty claims is scattered throughout the new collection, and some registers of bounty claims may have been filed in miscellaneous records.

Let's look at a few examples of documents related to bounty claims.

Register of Bounty Claims, Reel 23

Reel 23 of the Claim Division records contains four registers of bounty claims. This is a good place to start looking for records for your ancestor. The registers overlap in dates and are similar in content, however each may contain unique information so it is best to browse through all four volumes. Of these, volume four is the most comprehensive as it notes the disposition of claims (allowed or not allowed). For each entry in volume four, there may be a bounty claim preserved on reel 24 of the collection. 4

Bounty Claims, Reel 24

Below is the bounty claim of Israel Singleton, who served in the US Navy during the Civil War (please click on images to view larger). 5

Singleton Israel US Navy Battery Wagner Survivor Bounty Claim Reel 24 P2 Singleton Israel US Navy Battery Wagner Survivor Bounty Claim Reel 24 P3

A bounty claim may contain the following information:

  • Branch of the military the veteran served in
  • When, where and for how long a term of service he enlisted
  • Rank held
  • Duty stations
  • Date of discharge
  • Date of the bounty claim
  • Testimony of two witnesses as to identity of the claimant, including how long they had been acquainted with the claimant, and the nature of their acquaintance
  • Post office location for return correspondence
  • Signatures of claimant, Notary and witnesses
Here we learn that Israel Singleton enlisted in the United States Navy 9 Dec 1862, for a term of three years. During his service as a Landsman he served on two vessels, the Restless and the Vermont.

Singleton Israel Bounty Claim Reel 23 top

Witnesses to his identity were Sandy Black and James Gilliard. They had known Israel Singleton for seven years.

Singlton Israel Witnesses

Occasionally an introductory letter or narrative accompanied a bounty claim. In Israel Singleton's claim, an accompanying letter reveals a remarkable story of his service. The letter states that Israel Singleton served in both the United States Navy and the United States Colored Troops. After he was discharged from the Navy on July 31, 1864, he enlisted in the United States Colored Troops.

   
Enclosure, Bounty Claim for Israel Singleton, 1867

Enclosure, Bounty Claim for Israel Singleton, 1867

I Found A Military Bounty Claim for My Ancestor. Now What?

If you find a bounty claim for your ancestor, other Civil War service records available on FamilySearch, Fold3 and Ancestry.com await your further research:

  • 1890 Veterans Schedules on FamilySearch: Census schedules listing veterans and widows of veterans
  • Civil War Service Records for United States Colored Troops on Fold3: These records may document the soldier's name, rank, details about his service, birthplace, place of enlistment, discharge date and place and often a physical description.
  • Civil War and Later Veterans Pension Index on Fold3 and Ancestry.com: index cards for pension applications of veterans who served in the U.S. Army between 1861 and 1900. You can search by name, or browse by regiment number.
  • Civil War "Widows' Pensions" on Fold3: approved pension applications of widows and other dependents of Civil War veterans
  • Freedmen's Bank Records on FamilySearch and Ancestry.com: Many USCT veterans opened accounts at The Freedmen's Savings and Trust (Freedmen's Bank) when they received bounty payments. The USCT company and regiment are often listed, as well as the names of a veteran's parents, spouse, children and siblings. Freedmen's Bank records may also include information on the depositor's birthplace, residence, occupation and employer.

References Cited

[1] "Discharged Soldiers: $100 Bounty." Classified Advertisement, Newspaper Advertisement, The Charleston Daily News, 12 Nov, 1866, Page 4. Chronicling America, Database Online at the Library of Congress, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov, Accessed 11 Jan 2014.

[2] Descriptive Pamphlet for Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA microfilm publication M1910, 106 rolls). Washington, D.C., National Archives and Records Administration, 2005.

[3] Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, Database Online at the National Park Service, http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm, Accessed 12 Jan 2014.

[4] Descriptive Pamphlet for Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA microfilm publication M1910, 106 rolls). Washington, D.C., National Archives and Records Administration, 2005.

[5] "South Carolina, Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-36668-14620-6?cc=2127881&wc=M9HH-DX9:80296183 : Accessed 13 Jan 2014), Claim Division > Roll 24, Registered Bounty Claims, Aug 1866-Oct 1870 > Image 171 of 178, Bounty Claim of Israel Singleton.

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Going in Depth ~ SC Freedmen's Bureau Labor Contracts

BallWmJLaborContract1910-620316Cover

In one of the happiest developments in African American genealogy in South Carolina this year, FamilySearch has digitized all 106 microfilm reels in the NARA series Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA Micropublication M1910). This new digital collection is titled South Carolina, Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872.

This post is one of a series of posts with research tips for getting the most from this new collection. To follow all of Lowcountry Africana's posts for this significant new collection, please bookmark the index page here. Each post we add will automatically update to the Table of Contents in the upper right sidebar on that page.

In this post, we will look at Freedmen's labor contracts and the information they contain.

Labor Contracts

The regulation of written labor agreements between planters and freedmen was a major concern of the Freedmen’s Bureau. In South Carolina, some 8,000 contracts were signed, and nearly 130,000 freedmen worked under labor contracts between the years 1865 and 1866. The terms of the contracts were variable, but most labor contracts called for freed ancestors to receive housing, rations, medical attention, fuel, and a portion of the crop.1

Arrangement of Labor Contracts

Labor contracts on a single microfilm span several years. If you find a labor contract for your ancestor, there may be labor contracts for several more years on that reel of microfilm. The earliest labor contracts made in 1865 sometimes list first names only, but by reading on in the microfilm you may find contracts for subsequent years that list surnames of ancestors.

Anatomy of a Labor Contract

As with other records in this series, both the front and back of each page of a labor contract were photographed for the microfilm. If an inscription was written in a margin, the page was rotated and photographed again from that orientation.

The cover page lists the parties in the contract, location, date and occasionally, remarks. Within the record series, many documents are grouped together by the first letter of the last name of the planter, but are not in strict alphabetical order within that subset. It is best to read through all of the frames for the first letter of the former slaveholder's name before declaring your search unsuccessful.

Cover Page of Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen, 1866

Cover Page of Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen, 1866

There follows a statement of the terms of the contract, outlining the responsibilities of planters and Freedmen, and how the year's crop was to be divided. Most contracts were for one calendar year. The terms of many labor contracts were not far removed from what was required of enslaved ancestors - work days were long, Freedmen could not leave the plantation or have visitors without permission and possession of firearms or alcohol was prohibited.

Detail from Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen.

Detail from Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen (Please Click On Image to View Larger)

Following the contract terms is the signature page. Here the names of the Freedmen who entered into the contract are listed.

Detail from Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen (Please Click On Image to View Larger)

Detail from Labor Contract Between W.J. Ball and Freedmen (Please Click On Image to View Larger)

I Have Found an Ancestor Here. Now What?

If you find an ancestor in a labor contract or any other Freedmen's Bureau record in this collection, this record set should be on your research radar for intensive research.

Why? Because this means the Freedmen's Bureau may have been operating in the area where your ancestor lived. This means that any of the other records for the Field Office nearest your ancestor may hold treasures for you.

If you find an ancestor in a labor contract, rations list or other record within the collection, there may have been a sub-agent responsible for creating every type of record the bureau kept, for the area where your ancestor lived.

I Have Found More Than One Record for My Ancestor. Now What?

If you find more than one record for your ancestor in this new collection, the records for that particular Field Office should be on your reading list for browsing frame by frame.

We learned from the previous post on reading the descriptive pamphlet thoroughly that it was a common practice for agents to record more than one record type in a bound volume. The title of a bound volume therefore may not reflect the full contents of that volume. An example is this volume for Barnwell District labeled "Letters Sent" on the cover. Reading frame by frame, we found 5 different record sets in this bound volume. 2

Unbound records may be unarranged. The descriptive pamphlet notes whether records were arranged or unarranged when the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) received them. Unarranged records may have been catalogued as miscellaneous records, which are often overlooked.

If you have found more than one record for your ancestor within the records for a Field Office, reading through the records for that Field Office frame by frame is the only way you can be assured that you have exhausted all research avenues in this new collection.

About This Post

This post is one of a series of posts with research tips for getting the most from this new collection. To follow all of Lowcountry Africana's posts for the new FamilySearch collection South Carolina, Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872, please bookmark the index page here. Each post we add will automatically update to the Table of Contents in the upper right sidebar on that page, so you can be sure you never miss a post.

References Cited

[1] United States, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, Decriptive pamphlet for Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA Micropublication M1910).

[2] United States, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA Micropublication M1910).

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Freedmen's Bureau Records ~ Reading the Descriptive Pamphlet Can Lead You to Treasures

Related Records Screen Capture

Perhaps the most significant event in African American genealogy in South Carolina in 2013 came at year's end, when FamilySearch digitized all 106 reels of microfilm of the NARA micropublication Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA Micropublication M1910).

We dare say that there is scarcely a collection more significant for breaking through the 1870 brick wall than Freedmen's Bureau records. The records in this collection were made at the dawn of freedom, and can help you locate your SC ancestors in the period between 1865 and 1870 (the first year that the US Census recorded African American ancestors by name).

Before you dive into the new collection "South Carolina, Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872," taking a few minutes to read the descriptive pamphlet (reel guide) would be time well-spent. A close reading of the descriptive pamphlet can point you towards records you might miss by simply reading the titles of the reels in the new collection.

After you have identified and combed the richest records in this new record set, you may feel that you have exhausted the research possibilities. At that point in your research, the descriptive pamphlet could well become your best friend in your quest to leave no stone unturned.

Why? Because there are hidden treasures in this enormous body of records. And you can find them by reading the descriptive pamphlet closely.

Accessing the Descriptive Pamphlet for This Collection

There are two ways to access the descriptive pamphlet online. Within the collection at FamilySearch, the descriptive pamphlet is the first reel listed in the collection. There, you can browse the guide page by page.

If you wish to have the descriptive pamphlet open in another window, download the pamphlet for offline use or search the pamphlet, you can access the pdf version available here on Lowcountry Africana, in our Research Library.

Information in the Descriptive Pamphlet

Let's take a closer look at the descriptive pamphlet to see how it is organized, and what information it contains.

First Thing First: History of Freedmen's Bureau Operations in South Carolina

The first portion of the descriptive pamphlet outlines the history of Freedmen's Bureau operations in South Carolina. Here you can learn about the duties of the bureau and how these duties were divided among the various departments within the bureau.

Knowing which branches of the bureau generated records, and for what purpose, can not only help you identify records of interest within the collection, but can also help you identify related record sets and next steps if you find a record of interest.

Example: Property Dispute

For example, let's say you found a record in the new collection concerning a dispute between an ancestor and a former slaveholder over ownership of an item of personal property, and you would like to know where to look for more information about the settlement of the dispute.

From the descriptive pamphlet we learn that between May and September of 1865, Assistant Commissioners of the Freedmen's Bureau adjudicated cases between African Americans themselves, and between African Americans and whites.

In September 1865, military courts were given responsibility over all cases involving African Americans, and state courts were to handle cases involving whites. After the South Carolina Legislature adopted a measure in October 1866 recognizing freedmen’s rights and making African Americans' testimony admissible in state courts, all cases involving freedmen were turned over to state courts.

This background information can help us infer that if a dispute between an African American ancestor and a former slaveholder was settled before October 1866, records of the settlement may be in Freedmen's Bureau records. If the case was not settled before October of 1866, further records concerning the dispute may appear in records of the South Carolina state courts rather than in Freedmen's Bureau records. Knowing the history of the bureau's operations in South Carolina has in this instance opened a window to next steps and new research possibilities.

Records Description

Now we have some background on the bureau, so what's in this record set exactly? Here's where you find out.

Here we learn that the records consist of volumes and unbound records, and there follows a description of which records are contained in each. We also learn that some of the records for South Carolina created in 1862-1864 are included in this series. An important research tip in this section of the pamphlet is:

Some of the volumes contain more than one type of record, reflecting a common recording practice of clerks and staff officers in that period. On roll 32, for example, the Register of Letters Received, Vol. 1 (95), also contains a register of complaints. Researchers should read carefully the records descriptions and arrangements in the table of contents to make full use of these records.

Related Records

Pay close attention to this section of the pamphlet, for here are your research "next steps."

Related Records Screen Capture

In this section of the reel guide, we learn about related record sets available from the National Archives that supplement the records in this collection.

Table of Contents

Now that you have a solid background on the historical context, ready to dig into the records? This section of the descriptive pamphlet is where you can do just that, to identify which reels you would like to view. The Table of Contents lists in detail what is on each reel of the collection.

Below is an example of a page within the descriptive pamphlet (please click on the image to view larger). At the top of the page is the information for reels 62 and 63, Berkeley District. The pamphlet describes the contents of each reel and how the records are arranged, then follows detailed information about specific record types.

Reel Guide Screen Shot

The order the records are listed in is the order in which they appear on the microfilm.

We recommend reading every word of the descriptive pamphlet, to make the most of these records!

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2013: The Year That Was At Lowcountry Africana

By Toni Carrier
Flyer for Magnolia Plantation and Gardens Seminar, February 2013
Ramona La Roche Presents at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
Toni Carrier and Paul Garbarini Enjoy Ramona La Roche's Presentation on Reconstruction-Era Ancestors
Toni Presents on Freedmen's Bureau Records at Magnolia Seminar
Ramona Looks On As Toni Presents
L to R: Paul Garbarini, Dr. Ade Ofunniyin, Toni Carrier, Fallon Green, Charla Wilson Springer, Justin Heyward Lynes, St. James Chapel of Ease
Field Trip to St. James Chapel of Ease
Dr. Ade Ofunniyin, Toni Carrier, Fallon Green, Charla Wilson Springer
St. James Chapel of Ease Field Trip
Ramona La Roche and Dr. Ade Ofunniyin at St. James Chapel of Ease
Ramona La Roche and Dr. Ade Ofunniyin
Justin Heyward Lynes, Toni Carrier, Paul Garbarini
St. James Chapel of Ease Cemetery
Dr. O Pours a Libation on Foxbank Plantation, Goose Creek, SC
Historic Photo of Shuckers at McClellanville Canning Company, early 1900s
Unidentified Midwife at the Tampa Midwife Institute, Early 1900s
Male Midwife With His Family, Tampa Midwife Institute, Early 1900s
Georgetown Voter Registrations, 7 Days of Juneteenth
R: LCA Co-Director Alana Thevenet With Her Partner Judy
William Durant, LCA Senior Editor, Digitization Projects
Point of Pines Plantation's Crop Was Sea Island Cotton
Edisto Beach, SC at Sunset
Esteves Family Visits Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto Island
Theresa Hilliard, Point of Pines Plantation
The Food at Sea Cow Restaurant on Edisto Island Was Incredible
Lunch at the Sea Cow Restaurant After Point of Pines Visit
Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto Island, SC
The Cabin Move Begins
Smithsonian Curator Nancy Bercaw
Toni Carrier at Point of Pines Slave Cabin
Paul Garbarini, Ramon La Roche, Edisto Island, SC
Paul and Ramona
Door Pull, Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto
Layers of Wallpaper in the Point of Pines Slave Cabin
Arlene Esteves and Theresa Hilliard
New York Times Reporter Robbie Brown, Smithsonian PR Director Le Fleur Paysour
Nancy Bercaw, NY Times Reporter Robbie Brown, Mary Elliott
Nancy Bercaw, Robbie Brown
Museum Resources Inc. Disassembles Point of Pines Slave Cabin
The Walls Are Coming Down
Second Slave Cabin, Point of Pines Plantation, Edisto Island, SC
NY Times Photographer Stephen Morton Vexes Smithsonian PR Director Le Fleur Paysour
Boards Were Carefully Wrapped Before Being Placed on the Truck
Patti Cooper, Carroll Belser and Gretchen Smith, Edisto Island Historic Preservation Society
A Large Snake Had Made His Home in the Rafters
Last Wall Standing
Point of Pines Plantation, Edisto Island, SC
Wheat Field, Point of Pines Plantation
The Last Beam Comes Down
We All Sang Spirituals as the Final Wall Was Taken Down
L to R: Arlene Esteves, Junior Meggett, Theresa Hiliard
Theresa Hilliard, Mama Doonk Gullah Stories, Discusses the Cabin Move
Archaeologist Ralph Bailey and Arlene Esteves
Haint Blue Door of Point of Pines Slave Cabin
All Packed Up and Ready to Travel
Members of Lowcountry Africana, Edisto Island Museum and Smithsonian
Barn Interior, Sunnyside Plantation, Edisto Island, SC
View from the Roof of Sunnyside Plantation House
Flyer for 2013 History Fair, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
Toni Carrier and Ramona La Roche at the LCA Genealogy Advice Table, Magnolia History Fair
L to R: Paul Garbarini, Frank Davis, Toni Carrier
We Found Some Time for Reggae at the Beach
Dr. O Enjoys Reggae at the Beach
L to R: Faye Jensen, Nancy Bercaw, Mary Jo Fairchild at SCHS
L to R: George McDaniel, Nancy Bercaw and Tsione Wolde-Michael at Drayton Hall
African American History Memorial, Columbia, SC
Rice Field at Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Wooden Gates Called "Trunks" Controlled Water Flow In and Out of Rice Fields
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Outbuilding at Point of Pines Plantation, Edisto Island
150th Anniversary of the Assault on Battery Wagner
150th Anniversary of the Assault on Battery Wagner
150th Anniversary of the Assault on Battery Wagner
150th Anniversary of the Assault on Battery Wagner
LCA's Presentation at the AAHGS National Conference, Nashville, TN
L to R; Toni Carrier, Epic Photo Bomber, Angela Walton-Raji, Nicka Smith and Taneya Koonce, AAHGS National Conference
Shelley Murphy and Angela Walton-Raji, AHGS Conference
Angela Walton-Raji Presents at AAHGS National Conference, Nashville, TN
Shelley Murphy Presents at AAHGS National Conference, Nashville, TN
Ramona La Roche at Gullah Geechee Day, South Carolina State Fair
Sr. O at Gullah Geechee Day, South Carolina State Fair
Botany Bay Nature Preserve, Edisto Island, SC
Come Visit the LCAfricana Instagram Page!
Toni Carrier Photographs a Headstone in the Ford Family Cemetery, Johns Island, SC
L to R: Ramona La Roche, Mary Jo Fairchild, Dr. Ade Ofunniyin, Toni Carrier, William Perry, Virginia Ellison at SCHS Seminar
Paul Garbarini and Julie Dash Enjoy Lunch at the Unearthing Treasures Seminar, SCHS
Dr. O at the Entrance to Historic Cemetery on Daniel Island
Daniel Island Headstones
Headstone of USCT Veteran David Sparkman, Co. K 33rd USCT, Daniel Island Cemetery
New Slave Dwelling Project Website, Launched in November
Lowcountry Roots Travel Blog on LCA, Launched in November
Flyer for Event "The Lives of Enslaved Women," Redcliffe Plantation, Beech Hill, SC
This Year StoryCorps Celebrated Their 10th Anniversary
Lowcountry Africana is a National Partner of StoryCorp's National Day of Listening
Ramona La Roche's New LCA Youth Corner Page
FamilySearch Digitized 106 Reels of SC Freedmen's Bureau Records in December
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This page contains many photo galleries (we didn't want to leave anything out!). Please allow a few moments for the galleries to load.

The gallery above has 130 pics from this year. Be sure to scroll back up after reading the post, to enjoy our 2013 in pictures!

2013 was one of the busiest years at LCA yet. So busy that we rarely slowed down enough to blog about it! We got out in the community, caught up with old friends, met many wonderful new friends and were blessed by the contributions and accomplishment of several talented colleagues. 2013 brought us opportunities to participate in meaningful research and great collaborations. The year that was at LCA was one of our busiest, but one of our best.

February: Magnolia Gardens Seminar, Field Trip to St. James Chapel of Ease

Our first collaboration opportunity came in February, when we presented a seminar at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens on breaking through the 1870 Brick Wall. Ramona La Roche of Family TYES SC presented on Reconstruction-Era records and I presented on Freedmen's Bureau records. After the presentation, Ramona La Roche, Paul Garbarini of Uniquely Charleston Tours, Fallon Green of African American Genealogy With Fallon Green and I provided one-on-one genealogy advice to attendees.

Here we first met William Perry, whose roots are on Johns Island. Mr. Perry has been researching his family for many years and decided to travel from Washington, D.C. to attend the seminar. With him traveling so far to attend, we were hopeful that we would be able to make his trip worth it by working with him to find new leads for his research. Thank Goodness, during the one-on-one research, we were able to locate Mr. Perry's ancestor Moll Ford.

William Perry and Ramona La Roche

William Perry and Ramona La Roche

Field Trip to St. James Chapel of Ease

While we were all together, Ramona, Paul, Fallon and I took a field trip to visit the St. James Chapel of Ease to meet with Justin Heyward Lynes and members of the Friends of St. James Chapel of Ease organization. St. James Chapel of Ease was endangered but is now protected and being restored thanks to the dedicated preservation efforts of Friends of St. James Chapel of Ease. After many years of fundraising, they raised the money to purchase the property and immediately commenced restoring damaged headstones and clearing and cleaning the cemetery. It was wonderful to visit the cemetery and meet this dedicated group of concerned citizen preservationists.

Field Trip to St. James Chapel of Ease

Field Trip to St. James Chapel of Ease

Here our second blessing and collaboration opportunity appeared when we met Dr. Ade Ofunniyin. "Dr. O," as he is known in the heritage preservation community, is an anthropologist and the founder of Gullah Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to honoring Gullah ancestors and preserving their burial grounds. Dr. O joined us on the field trip at Ramona's urging and we are so happy that he did. In the months since, we have developed a meaningful collaboration with Gullah Society and Dr. O has become an invaluable member of our organization.

More good news - in February, we welcomed Ramona to LCA as Senior Editor. She hit the ground running and has brought so much magic to LCA with her dedication to honoring ancestors and preserving their stories. Ramona's special interest is in inspiring youth to learn and preserve family history and cultural heritage. Her new Youth Corner page on LCA will provide resources to inspire the next generation of family historians.

Ramona La Roche and Dr. Ade Ofunniyin

Ramona La Roche and Dr. Ade Ofunniyin

March: Launch of the Ancestors Page on LCA

One of the youngest shuckers at McClellansville Canning Company. All negroes and none extremely young. Location McClellansville, South Carolina. LOC 01025v Detail

In March we created a new blog called the Ancestors Page on Lowcountry Africana, where we post pictures of SC, GA or FL ancestors that need to make their way home to descendants. Have you found pictures of SC, GA or FL ancestors that you would like to share with the research community? You can share them on the Ancestors Page! Perhaps you have found a picture of an Ancestor that you would like to share online so descendants can find it. Or perhaps you descend from slaveholders and have pictures of African American ancestors who share your family's history.

If you have photos or documents that you would like to share, just drop us a line using our contact form, and we'll help you share! Your contributions will be cherished.

April: Smithsonian Research, Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto Island

In April we began researching the history of the Point of Pines slave cabin acquired by the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Edisto Island Historic Preservation Society had previously acquired the cabin in order to preserve it, but limited funding led them to the difficult decision to donate the cabin to the Smithsonian in order to protect it and assure that it would be interpreted for the public.

When the National Museum of African American History and Culture opens in late 2015, the cabin will be a centerpiece of the Slavery to Freedom exhibit.

April: A Milestone for the Fold3 Restore the Ancestors Project

Co-Director Alana Thevenet and Senior Editor, Digitization Projects William Durant have worked hard all year to index the final few reels of the Fold 3 collection "South Carolina Estate Inventories and Bills of Sale, 1728-1872." The entire collection will be indexed soon, and we are so grateful to Alana and William for the hard work they have poured into completing this major indexing project. Kudos and congratulations on this major achievement!

May: Smithsonian Cabin Move

In May, the Point of Pines Slave Cabin was carefully disassembled and each piece was meticulously labeled in preparation for the move. Lowcountry Africana was on hand for the cabin move, which was an incredible experience for us all.

A few days before the cabin move commenced, we met several descendants from the local community who remembered the families that lived at Point of Pines until the 1960s. We were blessed to met the Esteves family, who are descendants of James Hutchinson, a leader in the Edisto Island African American community during and after the Civil War.

James Hutchinson served in the U.S. Navy during the war. After Emancipation, he was a leader in the African American community as freed people forged new identities and negotiated the transition from slave to free labor. Hutchinson formed a land cooperative, purchased the "Berwick's" plantation on Edisto Island and subdivided the land among members of the cooperative. His family home is still standing on the road to Point of Pines Plantation.

Hutchinson's descendants Arlene Esteves and Theresa Hilliard joined us nearly every day during the cabin move and introduced us to other community members, including Mr. Junior Meggett, whose aunt and uncle lived in the cabin on Point of Pines. Mr. Meggett joined us several days during the move as well. Sharing the experience with Arlene, Theresa and Mr. Meggett was profound.

Arlene Esteves, Junior Meggett and Theresa Hilliard

Arlene Esteves, Junior Meggett and Theresa Hilliard

2013-05-15 13.34.16

One of the most profound moments of the experience was when Theresa, who is a professional story teller and founder of Mama Doonk Gullah Stories, channeled her grandmother's voice to discuss the significance of the cabin going to the Smithsonian, where millions will view it and learn about the Gullah/Geechee culture. It is difficult to put into words how emotional that moments was, as Theresa became her grandmother, channeling her voice and facial expressions.

Theresa Hilliard
Smithsonian Curator Nancy Bercaw
Smithsonian Curator Nancy Bercaw
Toni Carrier, Lowcountry Africana
Paul Garbarini and Ramona La Roche, Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto
Point of Pines Slave Cabin, Edisto Island, SC
The Cabin is Coming Down
Door Pull, Point of Pines Slave Cabin
Layers of Wallpaper, Point of Pines Slave Cabin
The Walls Come Down
Truck That Will Transport Disassembled Cabin to VA
The Last Wall Comes Down
The Final Beam Comes Down
Everyone Sang Spirituals As the Last Wall Came Down
All Packed Up and Ready to Travel
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#FFCC00fadetrue

Related Video: NBC News

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

May: Gullah Festival

Once the cabin was disassembled, loaded on the truck and driven off to its temporary home in Virginia, we headed down to Gullah Festival for the official launch of African American Genealogy With Fallon Green. Ramona, Paul, Dr. O and I helped out at the genealogy advice table on Friday and Saturday, where we assisted more than 100 family historians with their research. We also got to eat "fair food," funnel cakes, barbeque and of course, rice!

June: 7 Days of Juneteenth

7 Days of Juneteenth is a tradition here at LCA. Each year for 7 days leading up to Juneteenth, we post new record sets from the earliest days of freedom. This year, we focused on Beaufort and Georgetown 1868 Voter Registrations, Freedmen's Bureau requests for transportation and an especially rich Freedmen's Bureau rations list that preserves the names of elders on 112 plantations in and around Moncks Corner, SC. You can view those files and more in our Research Library.

July: History Fair at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

Flyer for History Fair, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, July 2013
Toni Carrier and Ramona La Roche at Genealogy Advice Table, Magnolia History Fair
L to R: Paul Garbarini, Frank Davis, Toni Carrier, Magnolia History Fair
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In July, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens held their first annual History Fair. Representatives from 19 of Charleston’s most historic organizations and four research groups that study rice cultivation in the Lowcountry, African-American family ties, history and culture and the workmanship of legendary blacksmith Philip Simmons participated.

We were there with our advice table, handouts from Charleston area archives and "How To" research handouts. We enjoyed our new and much-needed tent, which had its first outing at this event. The fair was well-attended and we were able to assist many attendees with their family research before an afternoon rainstorm ended the day a bit earlier than planned. We look forward to participating in Magnolia's History Fair again!

July: Smithsonian's Return Visit

In mid July, Smithsonian curators Mary Elliott, Nancy Bercaw and Tsione Wolde-Michael returned to the Lowcountry for a week-long visit. We packed a lot into that one short week, visiting Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Walterboro, Edisto Island, The South Carolina State Museum in Columbia, Drayton Hall and the South Carolina Historical Society.

The South Carolina Historical Society brought out some of their richest holdings for curators to view - slave badges, plats, plantation journals, photographs and more. The most remarkable of these treasures was the register of Reverend Alexander Glennie, an itinerant minister attached to All Saints Waccamaw Church in Georgetown. Glennie established chapels on several local plantations. There he catechised, baptised, confirmed, and married enslaved ancestors on those plantations, recording all of his activities in his journal. Remarkably, the ring Reverend Glennie used to marry enslaved couples in Georgetown has been preserved and is curated by the South Carolina Historical Society.

At Drayton Hall, Executive Director George McDaniel guided us through the Drayton Hall house and grounds, an extant rice dike and "A Sacred Place: The African American Cemetery at Drayton Hall."

The Reverend Albert "Chick" Morrison, Jr. of the New First Missionary Baptist Church on Edisto Island hosted a community meeting between elders in the African American community and Smithsonian curators. Elders shared many rich stories of the Edisto Island community of days past which will greatly enhance Smithsonian's interpretation of the cabin and understanding of the history of Edisto Island's African American community. Mrs. Emily Meggett generously shared her recollections of the Meggett family, who lived in the Point of Pines Slave Cabin until the 1960s. We also enjoyed lunch which was graciously provided by Gretchen Smith and Carroll Belser of the Edisto Island Historical Museum.

L to R; Mary Jo Fairchild, Faye Jensen, Halley Cella, South Carolina Historical Society
Halley Cella, Nancy Bercaw
Historical Treasures at South Carolina Historical Society
Mary Jo Fairchild, Faye Jensen, SCHS
Halley Cella, Nancy Bercaw, Mary Elliott
L to R: Faye Jensen, Nancy Bercaw, Mary Jo Fairchild
African American History Memorial, Columbia, SC
African American History Memorial, Columbia, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
L to R: George McDaniel, Nancy Bercaw, Tsione Wolde-Michael at Drayton Hall
Caw Caw Interpretive Center, Ravenel, SC
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July: Launch of the LCAfricana Instagram Page

In our ramblings throughout the Lowcountry we see so many beautiful landscapes and historic sites. So we decided to make an Instagram page where we can share our beloved Lowcountry with you! Please visit our page, which we add to regularly.You can follow us on LCAfricana on Instagram.

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October: AAHGS Conference, Gullah Geechee Day, SC State Fair

In October I journeyed to Nashville to present at the 2013 AAHGS Conference. The presentation, "Port Royal: Birthplace of Freedom in the Old South," examined the events which transpired after the capture of Port Royal, SC by Union troops in 1861. The events brought about by the capture of Port Royal set the stage for one of the largest social transformations in American history - the transition from slave labor to wage labor and from slavery to emancipation.

I so enjoyed finally meeting my genfriends Angela Walton-Raji, Shelley Murphy, Renate Sanders, Nicka Smith and Taneya Koonce (and an unidentified photo bomber, see below) in person after working online with them for so many years!

The AAHGS Conference was simply outstanding. The presentations, the hotel, the food and the comraderie were wonderful and I look forward to attending many more AAHGS conferences.

Also in October, Ramona and Dr. O presented at Gullah Geechee Day at the South Carolina State Fair in Columbia. Dr. O presented his work with his Gullah Society organization, and Ramona presented materials on Family TYES SC and Lowcountry Africana.

Angela Walton-Raji Presents at AAHGS Annual Conference, Nashville, TN
Shelley Murphy, Angela Walton-Raji
Shelley Murphy Presents at AAHGS Annual Conference
L to R: Toni Carrier, Epic Photobomber, Angela Walton-Raji, Nicks Smith, Taneya Koonce
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October: Ball Family Records

Priscilla Soft Edge Frame

October saw the debut of Henry Louis Gates' long-awaited PBS series The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. In the first segment, Gates highlighted the story of Priscilla, a 10 year old girl kidnapped in Sierra Leone in 1756, taken to Charleston, SC and sold there to rice planter Elias Ball. Priscilla labored on Ball family plantations for 55 years before she passed away at age 65.

Author Edward Ball, a descendant of Elias Ball, discovered Priscilla's story while researching the history of the Ball family and those they enslaved. Ball published his research in the award-winning book Slaves in the Family. Ball was able to trace Priscilla's family lineage in the extremely detailed and complete Ball family plantation records, and his research linked Priscilla to her great-great-great-great-great granddaughter Thomalind Martin Polite of Charleston.

Anthropologist Joseph Opala later discovered the log book of the ship Hare, Caleb Godfrey captain, which brought Priscilla from Sierra Leone to Charleston in 1756. With the discovery of the ship's log, there suddenly existed an unbroken 248 year paper trail linking Priscilla from the time she was taken from Sierra Leone, to present-day descendant Thomalind Martin Polite.

When the Sierra Leonean government learned of Thomalind's connection to Priscilla, they invited Thomalind to visit Sierra Leone as an honored guest, to bring Priscilla's spirit home to Africa after nearly 250 years. The 2005 trip, dubbed Priscilla's Homecoming, lasted twelve days, during which Thomalind was honored by government officials and community members alike.

We accompanied Thomalind on her trip in 2005, and as part of our ongoing contribution to the research, we traveled to every archive in the United States known to have Ball family records. In honor of Priscilla's story being highlighted in Henry Louis Gates' PBS series, we posted all of the extant Ball family wills, estate inventories and bills of sale on Lowcountry Africana, for others with roots on Ball family plantations to access. You can view the feature here: Do You Belong to Priscilla's Family? Take a Journey Through Ball Family Records to Find Out.

November: "Unearthing Treasures" Seminar, South Carolina Historical Society

On November 9th, we presented a seminar at the South Carolina Historical Society titled "Unearthing Treasures: Tracing Your African American Ancestors at the South Carolina Historical Society." This is the first African American genealogy seminar the South Carolina Historical Society has presented, and we were honored to be a part.

This seminar was very special for a number of reasons. The collections at the South Carolina Historical Society are among the richest and most significant for African American genealogy research in SC. The plantation journals, maps, plats and photographs in the holdings of the South Carolina Historical Society can open research windows for breaking through the 1870 Brick Wall and discovering the names and life stories of enslaved ancestors. Some plantation records such as the Ball Family Papers are virtually seamless from the early 1700s up to, and in some cases beyond, Emancipation. The LCA team was excited about sharing the rich resources at SCHS with family historians.

The seminar was limited to 30 participants, to enable archivists and LCA team members to work more closely with attendees. We spent the morning discussing research methods and plantation records, enjoyed a nice lunch, then devoted the afternoon to individual research in the South Carolina Historical Society's holdings.

In the days leading up to the seminar we worked with individual attendees to learn their areas of research interest and help identify collections of interest for them to view. As a result, we were able to fill out call slips ahead of the seminar and give them to attendees when they arrived, to help them hit the ground running during the individual research time after lunch. And our genfriend Bernice Bennett blessed us by retrieving a USCT pension file for a seminar participant. He, and we were so grateful to Bernice!

I presented on plantation records, Paul presented on maps and plats and Ramona presented on the visual collections at the South Carolina Historical Society. As a result of keeping the seminar size small, archivists were able to pull at least one archive item for each attendee.

This first seminar of its kind at the South Carolina Historical Society had a few glitches (parking issues, technical difficulties) but we emerged with many ideas to improve the research experience for the next seminar, in 2014. These include paring the seminar size down to 20 participants, grouping attendees and assigning a dedicated assistant for each group for individual research time, and sending out detailed parking information ahead of the seminar. We hope to make the second seminar an even higher quality research experience for attendees! The date for the second seminar will be announced in the coming month, so please stay tuned for more info.

L to R: Ramona La Roche, Mary Jo Fairchild, Dr. Ade Ofunniyin, Toni Carrier, William Perry, Virginia Ellison
Paul Garbarini and Julie Dash Enjoy Lunch at SCHS Seminar
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November: Field Trip to Johns Island

We were so excited to learn that Mr. William Perry had decided to journey again from Washington, D.C. to attend the South Carolina Historical Society seminar. The week before the seminar, Paul discovered some very rich land records for Mr. Perry's ancestors Shem and Moll Ford of Johns Island. The South Carolina Historical Society had a plat among the holdings that was very significant for Mr. Perry's research as well.

Thanks to these discoveries and Mr. Perry's gracious invitation, we accompanied him on a field trip to Johns Island the following day, where we met his family elders and learned more about his family's history.

The land described in the records and plat is still in his family today, including the family cemetery, which his family maintains. The cemetery is so peaceful, situated on a bluff overlooking a marsh. Some of the burials there date to the 1830s, and Mr. Perry's family is blessed to have preserved a rich and detailed oral history of the cemetery. It was an incredible day we were grateful to be a part of.

Toni Carrier Photographs a Headstone in the Ford Family Cemetery, Johns Island, SC
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November: Launch of The Slave Dwelling Project Website

This year marked several major milestones for Joseph McGill's Slave Dwelling Project. In November, LCA built and launched the project's brand new website.

Joe's project was blessed this year by the incredible contributions of Patt Gunn of Savannah. After participating in an overnight stay with the Slave Dwelling Project on Ossabaw Island, Patt resolved to become more closely involved with Joe's preservation efforts, and to help him establish the infrastructure he needs to take the Slave Dwelling Project to a new level.

Thanks to Patt's tireless efforts, this year the Slave Dwelling Project became a 501-c3 nonprofit organization, announce the Slave Dwelling Project Conference to be held in Savannah in September, and received their first major grant. The website is a natural extension of the project's growth. Please visit the site often to keep up with the latest Slave Dwelling Project happenings!

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November: Symposium: The Lives of Enslaved Women at Redcliffe Plantation

November 23, Ramona presented at "The Lives of Enslaved Women," a symposium at Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site in Beech Island. SC. James Henry Hammond, the former owner of Redcliffe Plantation, held more than 200 enslaved women between the years of 1831 and 1865. The symposium examined the lives of enslaved women as revealed in the Hammond Family Papers, and underscored the importance of remembering these enslaved women and interpreting their history.

November: Launch of the Lowcountry Roots Travel Blog on LCA With Guest Blogger Thomas Macentee

On November 6, we launched the new Lowcountry Roots Travel blog on Lowcountry Africana. We are grateful to Genealogy Ninja Thomas Macentee (CEO and Founder of High Definition Genealogy and Geneabloggers) for guest blogging to launch the Lowcountry Roots Travel blog with a bang.

December: FamilySearch Digitizes SC Freedmen's Bureau Records!

Just when we thought Christmas was over, FamilySearch digitized all 106 reels of Records of the Field Offices for the State of South Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 (NARA Micropublication M1910).

The New FamilySearch Collection, titled "South Carolina Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872" is not yet indexed but you can now access all 106 reels online in a free collection. We've created an index page for posts about this significant new online record set. We're developing a series of posts to look in-depth at the various types of records in this collection, and the information contained in each. All articles we post will automatically update to the Table of Contents in the upper right of the sidebar of this page: New FamilySearch Collection ~ South Carolina Freedmen's Bureau Records, 1865-1872.

Onward to 2014

Yes, 2013 was our busiest year yet, but without a doubt it was one of the best. We can't wait to see what 2014 has in store!

We are so grateful to our sponsors Magnolia Plantation and Gardens and Drayton Hall for making all of our work in the Lowcountry possible. Happy New Year and Happy Ancestor Hunting from the crew at Lowcountry Africana!

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