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Tag: CoAAG

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CoAAG 1st Edition Arrives In Town!

 
CoAAG 1st Edition Arrives In Town!

I am thrilled to announce the arrival of our new genealogy carnival -- the Carnival of African-American Genealogy (CoAAG) and so excited to host its 1st Edition -- Restore My Name Slave Records & Genealogy Research!

The show of support from the genea-community has been nothing short of AMAZING!

CoAAG's 1st Edition features 35 submissions from a diverse group of contributors! Represented in this historic Carnival offering are contributions from descendants of slaves, slave owners and free-men. We are Yankees and Southerners alike, seasoned GeneaBloggers and Newbies to the fold!

We're a blended community of descendants who have made the choice to heal history, rather than hide from it. I cannot say it enough how very proud of us I am.

With the arrival of CoAAG, we have made HISTORY my Friends! Never before has there been an open dialogue and exchange of slave data between descendants from both sides of slavery's history. We're breaking new ground for sure!

Thank you for supporting the Carnival of African-American Genealogy and if you missed this opportunity no worries, CoAAG will continue to roll into town every month moving forward on the 19th, so mark your calendars!

There is no better time to join the genea-discussion than NOW!

We are the change!:-)

Luckie Daniels, Host
1st Edition of the Carnival of African-American Genealogy   
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Guest Blogger: Bill Grimke-Drayton, Descendant of the Slaveholding Drayton Family in America and Barbados

  
African American Genealogy: Guest Blogger: Bill Grimke-Drayton, Descendant of the Slaveholding Drayton Family in America and Barbados
 
This blog is the first of our posts for the Carnival of African American Genealogy. A blog carnival comes together when a number of bloggers write about a specific theme. The Carnival of African American Genealogy is an ongoing series of African American themed blog entries which will result in many new published records and much dialogue between descendants of slaveholders and those they enslaved.
 
The theme of this carnival is Restore My Name: Slave Records and Genealogy Research. We are honored to welcome guest blogger Bill Grimke Drayton for this first carnival. This first carnival is hosted by Luckie Daniels from Our Georgia Roots and Our Alabama Roots.
 
Bill Grimke-Drayton is a direct descendant of the slaveholding Drayton family. The Drayton family had plantations and held slaves in Barbados, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and Texas.
 
Above: Bill Grimke-Drayton, 2006
Trip to Drayton Hall Plantation
Charleston, SC
 
Bill knew that his family was involved in rice cultivation in America, and that his family held many hundreds of slaves over time. In 2006, he made an emotional journey to Charleston, to rediscover and confront his family's history. After visiting Drayton Hall, the Drayton family's ancestral home in Charleston, South Carolina, Bill immersed himself in coming to terms with his family's slaveholding history.
 
To learn more about Bill Grimke-Drayton's reconciliation efforts, please visit his website Grimke-Drayton: From Slavery to Reconciliation.
 
Here, Bill shares his candid response to the questions posed by the Carnival of African American Genealogy.
 
Question: What responsibilities are involved on the part of the researcher when locating names of slaves in a record?
 
Bill Grimke-Drayton: It is important that he or she sees whether others have been on genealogical message boards who have access to family oral histories. In most cases the oral histories will be the only record available. I have a case in point where through Ancestry.com I am now in contact with another researcher whose named ancestor was a slave on one of our own family plantations. From results of a DNA test the researcher has discovered his African roots.
 
Question: Does it matter if the record(s) are related to your ancestral lines or not?
 
Bill Grimke-Drayton: No! I have been engaged in documenting the family trees with copies of censuses etc of African American families with the same surname as me. It has been a fascinating journey and I have found possible links to the family plantations, although this has been difficult to prove due to so-called "watershed" year of 1870, when before this year we have records mostly of slaves with only their first name. More and more people are keen to find their roots - even back to the plantations, because that may enable them to go even further back to Africa. This is where DNA results become absolutely critical.
 
Question: As a descendant of slave owners, have you ever been pressured by family not to discuss or post about records containing slave names?
 
Bill Grimke-Drayton: No! I'm even collaborating with a distant cousin who is a professional genealogist. Through African American clients, she has become aware of the personal nature of slavery as it effects individuals.
 
Please visit Bill's website Grimke-Drayton: From Slavery to Reconciliation to learn more about his efforts to share, and come to terms with, his family's slaveholding past.
 
To learn more about the Carnival of African American Genealogy, you can visit the Our Georgia Roots website by Luckie Daniels.
 
 
 
 
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Why Didn't I Know My Family Held Slaves?

Why Didn't I Know My Family Held Slaves?
 
     Hey everyone, I'm Toni Carrier, founder of Lowcountry Africana, the USF Africana Heritage Project and Afriquest.
 
     I'm blogging today about my research and addressing the questions of the first Carnival of African American Genealogy.
 
     The Carnival of African American Genealogy is an ongoing series of African American themed carnivals which will result in many new published records and much dialogue between descendants of slaveholders and those they enslaved.
 
     The theme of this carnival is Restore My Name: Slave Records and Genealogy Research. The carnival is hosted by Luckie Daniels from Our Georgia Roots and Our Alabama Roots.
 
     My Family's History
 
     I am a descendant of slaveholers in Copiah County, Mississippi (George Washington Furr), but I never knew this until I had been doing this research for many years. I wonder why this is so.
 
     The purpose of our work at Lowcountry Africana is to find the records that restore the legacy that African American ancestors left to this generation we live in. We have three websites dedicated to African American genealogy. We have been doing this research for eleven years.
 
     One night when I was talking to my mother, probably four years into this research, she said something that took me totally by surprise: she mentioned Daddy Furr's slaves.
 
     I was stunned, I said "Daddy Furr held slaves?" And she said "Oh yes, Daddy Furr had slaves."
 
     How could this be, four years after my mother knew what I do, that she told me our family held slaves?
 
     How many conversations had I had with mother yet she did not mention this, ever?
 
    Why? 
 
     I don't know.
 
     I don't know.
 
     Why did she not tell me this long before she did? We had been talking about my work for four years.
 
     Why Didn't I Know My Family Held Slaves?
 
     I just don't know.
 
     I'm still at a loss to explain it but my guess is that it has been something that some slaveholding families did not discuss. I'm still baffled by this, is it cultural? Were my ancestors told not to discuss slavery?
 
     I don't know. But I do know it is something that we should explore and question.
 
Toni
 
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Spread The Word! We're Having A Carnival!:-

 

Spread The Word! We're Having A Carnival!:-)


Good News! I am thrilled to see the Carnival of African-American Genealogy (CoAAG) come into fruition and honored to serve as its first Host!:-)

On March 19th Restore My Name Slave Records and Genealogy Research, will kick-off the first of an ongoing series of African-American themed carnivals, intended to be a gathering place for the community to share and learn about African-American genealogy.

Our first CoAAG discussion theme will deal with how records of slave ownership are handled by the genealogy researcher. Contributors will be asked to write a blog post (at their own blogs) on one or more of the following aspects:

* What responsibilities are involved on the part of the researcher when locating names of slaves in a record?
* Does it matter if the record(s) are related to your ancestral lines or not?
* As a descendant of slave owners, have you ever been pressured by family not to discuss or post about records containing slave names?
* As an ancestor of slaves, have you been able to work with or even meet other researchers who are descendants of slave owners?
* Have you ever performed a Random Act of Genealogical Kindness involving slave ownership records? Or were you on the receiving end of such kindness?

Submissions will be accepted starting today through March 12th 11:59 PM EST. Once youve created your blog post, use the blog carnival submission form to make sure it is included in the CoAAG post on 19 February 2010.

Were also in search of hosts for future CoAAG Carnivals so if you have interest, please give me (@OurGeorgiaRoots) and/or GeneaBloggers (@GeneaBloggers) a *tweet*!:-)

If youre new to carnivals and needing a quick how to so that you can join the fun, no worries checkout these two resources:

* Blog Carnival FAQs
* How to Submit a Post to a Carnival

Weve all witnessed the benefit yielded from coming together as a community to openly share our varying perspectives around slavery and its impacts to both past and present culture.

Lets commit to keeping this very relevant {and healing} dialogue going and use it as a catalyst to continue to grow and learn.

We must be the change we wish to see in the world ~ Mohandas Gandhi

Luckie.